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Messages - RichColvin

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1
Rob,

I’d love to get feedback on them.

Kind regards
Rich

2
JR,

I tried what you noted, and I like it a lot.  I updated this page, and noted that the idea was yours.



Rob,

With the SVD-186, when the JS is up at 6, it is basically not grinding elliptically any more.  When I tried what JR had recommended, it worked really well.  I do sweep the wings back with a positive rake angle of 20° as I think it works better for me.  The wings were still flat and not curved, btw.

And I like that the edge angle is 45° with this method.  I was only able to get it up to 35° when using the SVS-50.


As a final note, I prefer the way the SVD-186 mounts to the support bar, rather than resting against it.  Prevents slippage, especially when grinding in the vertical position.


So, for this tool, the Sharpening Handbook shows two jigs that can be used.  Thank you JR for the recommendation.

Kind regards,
Rich

3
Hello All

My name is Bill. I thought this would be the appropriate place for my first post. I've not purchased my T-8 yet but am saving towards it. I have plans to open a small sharpening business when I retire in a few years and the T-8 is on my kit list. I've been quite proficient at sharpening a wide variety of tools, knives, blades, chainsaws etc. for myself and others since very young thanks to my father's influence who would always take the time to sharpen a tool rather than try to use it dull. I'm almost always surprised by what some people think is sharp and they are almost always surprised when I give something back to them that I've sharpened.

I've used a variety of stones, papers, grinders and fixed angle jigs over the years and can't shake the urge to try something like the T-8. As a youngster I used to use an old treadle powered wet stone to sharpen freehand hatchets, axes, lawnmower blades and knives and became pretty proficient. I see the Tormek machines as the equivalent to the "Space Shuttle" as compared to the old treadle powered wet stone. With all the jigs, accessories, user mods, videos and expert user advice available for the Tormek machines I'm sure it will become an invaluable addition to my kit.

I tend to research the heck out of something before I jump in so I've got a lot of reading and learning from others to do here on the forum while saving for my own!

Bill,

Pay particular attention to those by Dr. Vadim Kraichuk ("Wootz" on the forum).  He has a shop in Australia called KnifeGrinders (http://knifegrinders.com.au/ ).  He has a sharpening business, and has done a LOT of research on how to sharpen most effectively and efficiently.

Good luck,
Rich

4
Wood Turning / Re: bowl gouges sharpening - "other shapes" graph
« on: January 17, 2020, 03:51:14 am »
JR,

Let me try that.  I only document what I’ve tried.  Sounds like a great idea though. 

Kind regards,
Rich

5
Rob,

I replaced my SB-250 with another one.  I looked at the diamond wheels, and here’s what I determined:  https://www.tormek.com/forum/index.php?topic=3805.0

But, I must add that I’m thinking about moving to the new Turner’s Edge gouges from Robust.  And, if this is indeed the case :

Quote
To make Turner’s Edge gouges, we start with premium high-speed steel (M2).  After machining, the tools are heat treated to 64 Rockwell C.  The hardened tools then go through the Nitriding process, increasing cutting edge hardness to 1880 Vickers (75+ Rockwell C).
  - http://www.turnrobust.com/product/turners-edge/

I may have to move to diamond wheels to sharpen those tools.  That is a pretty hard steel!

Kind regards,
Rich

6
General Tormek Questions / Re: New SVD-186R jig
« on: January 16, 2020, 03:49:49 am »
Ken,

The email I received today from Tormek showed it being used with an MB-100 Multi Base on the side of a diamond wheel.  What are your thoughts on using it on a traditional grindstone?

Kind regards,
Rich

7
Wood Turning / Re: bowl gouges sharpening - "other shapes" graph
« on: January 16, 2020, 03:44:36 am »
JR,

I’ve tried to simplify that chart on this page :  http://sharpeninghandbook.info/WW-BowlGouge.html

Does that help?

Kind regards,
Rich

8
Wood Turning / Re: Ellsworth Grind with SVD-185 Not Possible?
« on: January 09, 2020, 11:32:30 pm »
SmokeGSU,

With higher JS numbers (i.e., >4), you will have to either
  • grind each side separately & match them at the nose, or
  • move the jig along the USB as you grind the edge on the grindstone.

I generally do #1 at the start, & then #2 at the end.  Just be sure to watch the wings to ensure they are similar.

Option 2 feels funny at first, but once you get the hang of it, it is pretty easy.

Kind regards,
Rich

9
Wood Turning / Glenn Lucas’ picture on Instagram
« on: January 08, 2020, 03:04:32 am »
Glenn Lucas posted this picture on Instagram.  Really nice!

Rich

10
General Tormek Questions / Re: Why Japanese Water Stone
« on: December 31, 2019, 01:34:32 am »
Budbon,

I had to sharpen some drill bits for a Chinese ball that I’m making.  It is important that the drill bits be sharp for this operation.  The SJ grindstone is awesome for adding that extra bit to the surface of the drill bit’s primary facets.

So, I have to add this to the reason I like the SJ grindstone.

Kind regards,
Rich

11
Wood Turning / Re: An evening with Doug Thompson
« on: December 29, 2019, 01:51:53 am »
I am feeling the need to update my metallurgy knowledge. There have been so many advances since my college classes and early mechanical engineering work and my knowledge is I am afraid severely dated. I think I will start with a trip to the library and possibly take a refresher college class.

It appears that some of the steels and their heat treatment is proprietary but we do get enough information to make wise choices when sharpening.

John,

Check out your local university.  Many allow seniors to audit courses for free.  I’m not yet 60, but when I am, I’ll certainly take advantage of this!

Kind regards,
Rich

12
Wood Turning / Re: An evening with Doug Thompson
« on: December 28, 2019, 02:24:13 am »
Mike,

What I recorded for “V vs U” shape is that the “U” has no wing, but a larger cutting edge at the bottom.  I don’t remember him talking about parabolic shapes though.  But send him an email and ask.

Kind regards,
Rich

13
General Tormek Questions / Re: Why Japanese Water Stone
« on: December 26, 2019, 02:53:14 pm »
I too have a Tormek SuperGrind 2000.  Bought it in 2002.  I used the SG grindstone as often as I can as I find it really effective and easy to use.  I use the SB grindstone for HSS turning tools as it works better.  Same machine for both. 

I tried the diamond stones and found they are quite good.   I just didn’t want to fuss with the water each time, and the up-front cost is pretty high for what I do.  Like you, I want to use it when needed.   I’m not running a sharpening business.

I did eventually wear down my first SG and SB grindstones to 180mm.  And I’m on my second set.  Not bad for 17 years of use! 

The other good news also is that old grindstones are in use on a friend’s smaller Tormek T4.  They will probably be used by him for another 10-15 years.   That says a lot about the ethics of Tormek that they make a grindstone that is designed to be worn away, but make it to last 30+ years!

A fellow Woodturner at my club called this the “Cadillac” system.   I disagree as, when compared to getting a good 8” grinder ($130), 2 CBN grinding wheels ($200), & 2 quality platforms ($120), you are not that far off the cost of a Tormek T8.

So, the SG grindstone is a good way to go.

Kind regards,
Rich

14
I find that when it is easy & fast to resharpen, I do so often.  And that makes my woodturning ever so much easier, better, & produces far better results.

Kind regards,
Rich

15
General Tormek Questions / Re: Why Japanese Water Stone
« on: December 25, 2019, 09:12:36 pm »
I have the SJ grindstone and use it when sharpening the tools where it excels:
  • wood carving tools, and
  • bench tools for woodworking (e.g., chisels & marking knives).
I find it more accurate and also faster than using the honing wheel. This is especially true when touching up the secondary/micro bevel.

But, that’s just one man’s opinion.

Rich

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