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Messages - RichColvin

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1
General Tormek Questions / Re: Repair SJ-200 Stone?
« on: December 04, 2019, 05:52:00 pm »
I sharpen with the SJ stone turning away from me.

Kind regards,
Rich

2
General Tormek Questions / Re: Repair SJ-200 Stone?
« on: December 04, 2019, 03:44:32 am »
When I got chips, it was from being too aggressive with the diamond truer.  They didn’t impact my use if the stone. 

If it does on yours, I’d round or bevel it out using the grading stone.

Kind regards,
Rich

3
General Tormek Questions / Great sayings
« on: December 01, 2019, 01:30:47 pm »
Saw this in Ornamental Turning by J.H. Evans (1903)

Of all the tools in the workshop whether of the amateur or of the practical man, the absence of the grindstone would be the most severely felt, without it the restoration of the edges of the tools would be scarcely possible, and upon their perfection much of the practical success of cutting processes depends.

Sharp tools produce the least expenditure of time, surfaces so nearly finished as to require but very little polishing, whereas blunt tools leave the lines and moldings less accurately defined, and the additional friction or polishing employed to gloss over the defects makes a bad case worse, and obliterates all the keen edges that would impart to the work a defined and exact character.

4
Knife Sharpening / Re: Front Vertical Base
« on: November 29, 2019, 12:15:39 am »
Peter,

I have cataloged all those at this site :  http://sharpeninghandbook.info/indexJigs.html

Kind regards,
Rich

5
I recommend against that.  I can not believe it will come out good. 

Kind regards,
Rich

6
Mike,

Yes, I suppose that would be the best bet.  I'm going to make a wooden holder for the blade to use with my Eclipse honing jig and water stones.  The same holder would give the short little spokeshave blade a bit more stability on the SVD-110.  Still, it would be nice to have something to clamp around it or over it while it's on the wheel.  My holder is probably going to be too thick to use the SE-77.  Maybe I'll rethink its design to thin it down.

Thanks,
Bob

Bob,

There is a great article in Fine Woodworking about the wooden holder I think you are referring to.  (You may need a membership to read it online  — don’t know.)

   https://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/12/03/how-to-sharpen-a-spokeshave

This would work well with a platform like the SVD-110.

Kind regards,
Rich

7
Knife Sharpening / Re: Front Vertical Base
« on: November 28, 2019, 02:36:32 am »
Peter,

The Tormek small knife holder works well for knives where the blade is centered in the handle (e.g., a carving knife), but less so with folding, multi-blade knives. 

Kind regards,
Rich

8
Ton,

Thank you for letting me know of the missing document.  I will add these later today. 

Kind regards,
Rich

9
Wood Turning / Re: Sharpening Turning Tools
« on: November 16, 2019, 03:58:16 pm »
Rick,

It’s called a Spear Point tool.  It is a scraper, & Mike’s use is quite common. 

Sharpening instructions are at http://www.sharpeninghandbook.info/WW-SpearPoint.html

Kind regards,
Rich

10
Hand Tool Woodworking / Re: Another se77 out of square plane blade
« on: November 16, 2019, 03:51:41 pm »
Ken,

Thanks for the thoughtful reply.  I finally opted for the Tormek because it provides what I regard as the necessary missing step in sharpening for my hand plane (and spokeshave) blades and chisels:  regrinding after several honings have revealed too wide an edge to hone quickly.  My leather wheel remains untouched, and I have only the stock grinding wheel.  Perhaps one day I'll see the need to use the leather or some esoteric wheel material.  But for me, the machine is worth having because it does a unique and necessary task in my work.  Mr. Charlesworth opening my eyes to its value, but to say that he "only" uses it for grinding and therefore does not cast the machine in its full light misses the fact that cool, low-speed, controllable grinding is valuable enough for a wide range of Tormek's customers.

Bob,

If you get to using harder metal chisels (e.g., powdered metal), then using an SB grindstone May be a worthwhile investment. 

Kind regards,
Rich 

11
Steve,

I’m the creator of the Sharpening Handbook.  I truly believe I will never be the font of all wisdom (though I’ve had plenty of learning mistakes), and this tool can only get better with others’ help.  And since most of the information came from others, it will stay free to use. 

So if you find there are errors in my assumptions or calculations, please do elaborate.  I’ll be grateful, and happy to fix it,

Kind regards,
Rich

12
Wood Turning / Re: Sharpening Turning Tools
« on: November 11, 2019, 02:38:10 am »
Rick,

I catalogued a lot of information that ma be useful.  It’s at http://www.SharpeningHandbook.info/


Kind regards,
Rich

13
Wood Turning / Re: Why is skew chisel taking soooo long to sharpen?
« on: November 01, 2019, 12:46:16 pm »
I find that when I change grindstones, I have to adjust the projection, even if slightly.  Using a Sharpie to verify the projection is right is a good way to check this. 

Kind regards,
Rich

14
Wood Turning / Re: Why is skew chisel taking soooo long to sharpen?
« on: October 29, 2019, 03:22:33 pm »
GGee, the HSS steel of your chisel contains several hard carbides (tungsten and vanadium e.g.) which are harder than Al2O3 abrasive in the SG stone or the SiC abrasive in the SB stone.
Despite this fact we can use SG or SB stone to sharpen HSS steel. What happens is following: the Al2O3 or SiC grounds away the steel matrix enclosing the hard carbides which are then torn out of the steel. It is understandable that this occurs at the price of low grinding performance and high wear of the grinding stone.

Diamond or CBN wheel will solve the problem.

Jan

Jan,

Thank you for the explanation.  That makes sense!  Now I know why (instead of just how).

Kind regards,
Rich

15
Wood Turning / Re: Why is skew chisel taking soooo long to sharpen?
« on: October 29, 2019, 12:03:37 am »
Gareth,

I probably have the same one :  a Robert Sorby oval skew. 

This is not uncommon.  The reason is this :  there is a lot of surface area to be ground, especially for shallow included angles like 30° (vs. a bowl gouge).  And this large surface area is what takes so long.

What I have found to accelerate getting it to the next level is holding the gouge against the grindstone (using my right hand) whilst also holding the stone grader (SP-650) against the grindstone (in my left hand).  That keeps the grindstone's surface rough and makes for this process happening faster.  It will sound like you are adding sand to the process.

But, once you get a smooth surface across the whole area, you'll need to set the stone grader down and go from there.


Of course, there is always the option to use the course grit diamond grindstone ... but that is a very different cost option.

Kind regards,
Rich

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