Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - RichColvin

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 45
1
Ivar,

I believe the XB-100 base (https://www.tormek.com/usa/en/spare-parts/other-spare-parts-and-upgrades/xb-100-horizontal-base/ ) needs to be added to your machine to accommodate that.

You should send a note to support at Tormek and ask them.

Kind regards,
Rich

2
General Tormek Questions / Re: Tormek with Norton 3x
« on: June 26, 2020, 04:28:08 am »
  I have been using my T8 with the DBS-22 and other miscellaneous sharpening on tools. I use the standard wheel and was looking into the SB or diamond wheels when I saw Ken S and another had experience with the Norton 3x. I had one for a different grinder so it wasn't hard to go that direction. Mounting it was an in house solution with my Taig micro lathe and some scavenged ABS and bronze bushings to mate with the 12mm shaft since the 2" O.D. x 1/2" I.D. would only get so far.  The Norton3x certainly leaves a coarser finish but my quest for a bit more aggressive grind without drawing temper makes the possibility of lathe bit grinding & reshaping more practical.

I find the SB grindstone more than adequate for grinding the drill bits I sharpen.  And i go the opposite direction:  some get finally honed on the SJ grindstone.

Kind regards,
Rich

3
John,

The wedge shape is entirely due to the rotation of the bit’s cutting edge.  This is outlined in the manual for the DBS-22 on pg. 14.  Here is a link to the online version :  https://www.tormek.com/media/105148/instruction_dbs22_en.pdf

I have found that when removing a lot of metal for badly mis-shapened bits, the location of the cutting edge needs to be adjusted.  What happens is that, as the metal is removed, the edge is rotating around due to the rotation of the flute on the drilling bit’s shaft.  There is discussion about this on pg. 13.  This can also happen when significantly changing the point angle (see also, pg. 6).

So, the solution is to grind away the badly mangled edge, and then re-check the alignment.  I find that using the magnifier as discussed on pg. 7 to be useful.  I do this even on larger bits as it is a bit easier for me to see the alignment.

More guidance is here :  https://www.sharpeninghandbook.info/GT-DrillBits-Twist.html

Good luck.

Kind regards,
Rich

4
Hand Tool Woodworking / Re: micro bevels
« on: June 20, 2020, 12:01:05 am »
Ken,

I use micro bevels for sharpening certain tools, but not for all.  The places I find it most useful are:
  • Chisels and planes (as you noted),
  • Knives, especially pocket knives,
  • Tools with carbide inserts (for both wood and metal lathes), and
  • Fly cutters, especially as the metal is so hard!
With certain lathe tools, especially the bowl gouge, I find that a relief grind is needed to prevent bruising the wood as I traverse the concave curve.  This works like a micro bevel in that it is also faster to resharpen.

I documented my findings here, including outlining the angle delta I use for the micro- / secondary bevel.  http://sharpeninghandbook.info/MicroBevels.html

Where I find it does not work well is for tools that need to use the full surface.  One example of that is the wood lathe skew.

Kind regards,
Rich

5
General Tormek Questions / Re: wheel storage
« on: June 11, 2020, 04:20:40 pm »
Chino,

I store my vertically.  The ideas I’ve collected are here:  http://sharpeninghandbook.info/Grindstones-Storing.html

Good luck.
Rich

6
Hand Tool Woodworking / Re: Regrinding skew chisels
« on: June 11, 2020, 02:14:53 am »
Mike,

You can try to use the SVS-50 with a piece of wood cut to the proper angle and used to set the jig.  The 1st picture I’ve attached shows an example of what I’m thinking.

You could also use an SVD-110 with a standardized spacer.  The 2d picture shows one I made for grinding a known angle on that platform.

If you need something more accurate than that, you will need to make a goniostat.  The one I made is used on the SVD-110  Tool rest and is outlined here:  http://sharpeninghandbook.info/indexJigs.html#Goniostat

Kind regards,
Rich

7
Hand Tool Woodworking / Re: Regrinding skew chisels
« on: June 10, 2020, 03:09:25 am »
Bob,

These are my notes:  http://sharpeninghandbook.info/WW-Chisels-Carving.html

Kind regards,
Rich

8
Knife Sharpening / Re: Knife Sharpening - Blade Angle Database
« on: June 08, 2020, 03:16:31 am »
Chris,

I’ve documented what I and others have found works best.  It is here:  http://sharpeninghandbook.info/index-KN.html

Good luck.

Kind regards,
Rich

9
Thank you Ken.  Appreciate it.

10
I've added this to the Sharpening Handbook:

          https://www.sharpeninghandbook.info/indexBooksVideosWebSites.html

Thanks to Tormek for really fine work.

Kind regards,
Rich

11
Knife Sharpening / Re: Knife protection in knife jig
« on: May 22, 2020, 02:16:10 pm »
Has anyone tried using plumbing gasket material like this https://www.lowes.com/pd/Keeney-6-in-Rubber-Washer/1082955 ?  It is cheap, easily available, and can be cut to size.

12
General Tormek Questions / VERY Old School Sharpening
« on: May 21, 2020, 03:14:05 pm »
André Jacob Roubo published a great picture on how the old guys used to make their own tool sharpeners.  I am SO happy we now have Tormeks!


13
Knife Sharpening / Re: Polishing angle calc
« on: May 17, 2020, 02:41:59 am »
I've added this to the calculators available from the Sharpening Handbook.  Here is the page link:  https://www.sharpeninghandbook.info/indexCalc.html

Kind regards,
Rich

14
General Tormek Questions / Re: Cutting Machine round plates
« on: May 05, 2020, 03:27:21 am »
Ernst,

Are you talking about one of the deli-style meat slicers with blades that are about 14 inches in diameter?

Kind regards,
Rich

15
General Tormek Questions / Re: Application wet grinding machine
« on: May 01, 2020, 04:15:39 pm »
Niklas,

It can probably be done, but you would need to experiment with different grinding stones to see what works best.  My initial thought is that the diamond grindstone would be best, but I don't know what your needs are.

As for making the process very repeatable, jigs can be made, and many have been already. 

RickKrung on the forum has used motors to automate the truing of the grindstone (that was about a yr or so ago).

If you go about automating movement, consider using a stepper motor.  They give great torque at low speeds, and can be slowed more easily that a variable frequency drive.  They are also smaller and less expensive than geared motors.  For my rose engine lathe, I often run mine at speeds measured in minutes per revolution.

Stepper motors can be controlled using a controller like one from Pololu Tic.  And a rotary encoder can be used to easily control the speed.  Or it could be fixed with the Pololu's settings.

Some links to get started with that are:
Good luck.

Rich

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 45