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Messages - RichColvin

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31
General Tormek Questions / Re: Japanese SJ-200 Wheel Issue
« on: October 12, 2019, 05:51:06 am »
I agree with Ken.  Sell the unused SJ-200, & get an SJ-250.  You will get much more life out of the stone. 

Kind regards,
Rich

32
Chay,

Consider getting an SVH-60.  May be on eBay.  Really useful for shorter tools.

Kind regards,
Rich

33
General Tormek Questions / Re: SVS 50 questions
« on: October 01, 2019, 02:42:31 am »
Mike,

That’s a great catch.  I have been racking my brain to figure this out.

Kind regards,
Rich

34
Wood Turning / Re: Best methods and wheel for sharpening bowl gouges
« on: September 26, 2019, 04:09:31 am »
This is a wood turning only statement, hand tools, knives etc. are completely different.

Pete is exactly right.

35
Wood Turning / Re: Best methods and wheel for sharpening bowl gouges
« on: September 26, 2019, 04:04:25 am »
Ken and are well aligned on all but one point.

I used an SG grindstone for many years before moving to an SB grindstone.  I find the SB grindstone to be faster than the SG grindstone for HSS, but not more effective.  Indeed, for some of my older, high carbon lathe tools, I prefer the SG grindstone (you know, the skews and gouges that we all have inherited and can’t part with). 

Both grindstones work remarkably well.  And if you are having difficulty with one, go to the one that works for you.  Sharpening should not be a difficult chore. If it is too onerous, you won’t resharpen often enough.  And that will make the woodturning to be much less fun than it can be. And it is also unsafe as you will have to force the tool too much. Dull tools will hurt you far faster than you’d imagine.

Then, after a some months or even a year, go try the SB grindstone again.  You may find it easier to master then.  If not, then sell the grindstone and stick with the SG grindstone.  What works for you is what is more important. 

Allan Batty was a master with a skew.  His son never mastered the skew and uses a gouge instead.  Both gave/give us awesome works, and I doubt anyone knows (or cares) what type of tool was used.


Where I disagree is this :  the SVD-186 is so far superior to the SVD-185 that you should invest in that as soon as you can.  I think it is more important to your sharpening regimen than the use of the SB grindstone on HSS instead of the SG grindstone.


Bit Long, but I hope I helped.

Kind regards,
Rich

36
Wood Turning / Re: Best methods and wheel for sharpening bowl gouges
« on: September 25, 2019, 11:06:59 pm »
I use a DMT D8X Extra Course diamond plate to de-glaze my SB grindstone.  It is this one :

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001DZOKNY/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Kind regards,
Rich

37
General Tormek Questions / Re: Retired my old SB grindstone
« on: September 21, 2019, 03:49:52 am »
It can be repurposed for a T-4 with no changes.  More details about using a worn down 250mm stone on a 200mm machine are at this page :  https://sharpeninghandbook.info/Grindstones-StoneLife.html

I looked into this, and while it is an option, it didn’t merit the cost of a T-4 for me.  (I’d opt for a second 250mm machine instead.)

What is generally agreed is that, if you need a T-4 anyway (e.g., to carry it to a farmers market), then this may be a good option.

In the 17 years I’ve owned the T-2000, I’ve totally consumed only two grindstones :  One SB-250, & one SG-250.

Kind regards,
Rich

38
General Tormek Questions / Retired my old SB grindstone
« on: September 20, 2019, 10:45:58 pm »
Today, I was resharpening some drill bits with the DBS-22 Drill bit sharpening attachment.  My SB-250 grindstone is so worn (lovingly used down to 180 mm) that I had to take off a knob on the USB’s base so the DBS-22 would not hit it.

It seems my old SB stone that has finally reached it’s retirement. 

SB, thank you for the great work over many years.  RIP my old friend.  Enjoy your days with my retired SG-250 stone.

Rich

39
Knife Sharpening / Re: An alternate jig setting knife block
« on: September 20, 2019, 04:10:52 am »
I too use a fixed block at 139mm.  Works well for me.

Kind regards,
Rich

40
General Tormek Questions / Re: SVS 50 questions
« on: September 18, 2019, 03:09:36 am »
Ray,

The only thought I have is to be sure the projection is set correctly.  The manual says to do it the way shown in the picture attached (which I thought was odd for a while)

Good luck,
Rich

41
Chris,

Thanks for the kind words. 

If you see something that needs correcting, or better clarification, please do let me know.

As a wise podcast says, “none of us is as smart as all of us.”

Kind regards,
Rich

42
Chris,

The better steels and steel treatments in newer chisels only increase the time before you need to resharpen.  There are some who believe the older high carbon steel gets sharper.  That’s a debate for others.  I believe you gotta dance with the one you’re with.

Kind regards,
Rich

43
General Tormek Questions / Re: New to forum
« on: September 17, 2019, 03:17:02 pm »
Hi Tormek people,

I am excited to get my new T8. I ordered it a couple of days ago. I am a home hobbyist.  I’ve wanted a Tormek for years but could not justify the expense. I have finally got tired of spending hours sharpening. I realized I was wasting a lot of woodworking  time just sharpening tools. I’m looking forward to learning from you veterans.

My first question is about truing the side of the SG-250 stone with the SP-650 stone grader. Is this recommended?  I want to make sure my chisels are flat on the back. If not, are there any recommendations?
Thanks,
Azsteve
(Steve)

Steve,

The Tormek only seems expensive.  But, it is less expensive in the end as it gives you more life on your tools due to its removal of less metal.  So you made a wise investment.

As for truing the sides of the grindstone, you cannot.  But it doesn’t matter as you hold the chisel’s back against the side of the grindstone by hand.  No support is needed.  Page 122 of the Tormek manual shows this (an excerpt of the manual as shown below). 

You may need to periodically grade the side (using the SP-650 stone grader https://www.tormek.com/usa/en/accessories/other-accessories/sp-650-stone-grader/ ).  But that is pretty rare.

Good luck,
Rich

44
Rich,

The traditional two point hollow grind technique predates the Tormek. In my opinion, it was more useful with the typical six inch dry grinders of the day than with the large diameter Tormek wheel. The secondary micro bevel lessened the hand sharpening labor. I don't see the advantage when the work is done by the Tormek machine.

My opinion......

Ken

Not my preference.  Just wanted to note that it is relatively common with high end furniture makers, even when they sharpen on the Tormek.


45
Chris,

The concavity of the grind on a 250mm wheel is quite small, barely noticeable.  But, it is common to do just what you are saying. 

Indeed, I’ve read some woodworkers will sharpen on a Tormek, and then hone on flat stones to 13,000 grit or so.  They’ve said that honing is easy as the blade’s edge is balanced on the two edges.  To outline this, see the picture on the right of this page :  http://sharpeninghandbook.info/WW-Chisels.html

Good luck,
Rich

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