Recent Posts

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1
Knife Sharpening / Re: Budget work station option?
« Last post by john.jcb on Today at 02:44:43 pm »
If you get a cafeteria type tray make sure it is large enough for your RB-180 to rotate freely.
I made a similar base out of an unused microwave stand. Does not have drawers like yours but it works and frees up the workbench.
I used a larger plastic tray from the bottom of a dog crate. It works well.
2
Drill Bit Sharpening / Re: problem with grinding secodary facets
« Last post by courierdog on Today at 02:44:38 am »
Having gone through this exact same problem.
My initial attempt I thought I got the Primary Facet exactly as per the manual.
SO What to do, I found worked for me was editing the Instruction Manual for a 16 page Illustrated Instruction Manual to an 89 Page expanded Illustrated Instruction Manual.
Then I had to follow the Manual exactly as written.
It was very tedious and very time consuming.
I found that my Primary Facet was not ground perfectly, however with more patience, and slowing down, I was able to get the Primary Facet exactly as described.
Note this involves ensuring the final grinds are aligned with the line on the Drill Bitt Holder.
When I then moved onto the Secondary Facet grind, I noticed it was the heel of the bit that showed the Secondary Facet Grind that began to appear.
As Ken S said, slow down and sneak up on the Secondary Facet. The Secondary Facet seems to happen much faster than the Primary so go very slow, and ensure as you inspect you work to touch up the drill bit alignment as from my experience, gores very fast and the least bit off alignment you will see the facet look very lopsided very easily. this is cured by careful attention to the alignment.
That First Secondary Facet is a real thrill as you see it develop and are able to vary it back and forth with the drill bit alignment, This is where the use of the magnifier really helps. A tiny adjust meant, a single pass and you will see the facet development.
Patience and consitintancy pays off in 4-Facet dividends.
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Drill Bit Sharpening / Re: DBS-22 Base Plate Mod
« Last post by courierdog on Today at 01:52:43 am »
At first I could not understand the why for the mod. At first I thought Tormek may have changed the dimensions of the base plate. I was wrong. I looked again carefully as to the reason for the mod. Before the mod the movable portion of the Jig over runs to base plate. With the mod the movable portion of the Jig is more balanced on the base plate. So it looks like I will have to do this modification to balance to movable portion on the static baseplate.
This is just a wonderful piece of kit and while it works very well the way it is, this mod should make the overall balance and the resulting grind a much more smooth operation and keep more of the movable portion operating on the centre of the baseplate.
Thanks again to everyone who share their experience to make our lives easier.
How ever My thought is why does Tormek not make the base plate a little wider and modify the mount to allow for the shifting of the baseplate so the grinding operation stays dead centre on the baseplate centred on the Grinding wheel.
Thanks for Listening.
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Knife Sharpening / Re: Budget work station option?
« Last post by ROC on Yesterday at 07:49:54 pm »
Thanks for the suggestion.
I did notice the compound dirties the surface as well.
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General Tormek Questions / Re: US-105 vs US-103
« Last post by Ken S on Yesterday at 07:00:46 pm »
Ega,

From the frame out, the shafts of the T4 and T8 size Tormeks are identical. The outsideof the 250mm (T8 size) wheels have more indent, so either size can be mounted. The end screw keeps the square edge tool in the jig from falling offof the grinding wheel. CB is correct; it is better stated that the US-105 is shorter to compensate for the narrower grinding wheel.

The flat acme thread surface provides more bearing surface for the locking knobs on the sleeves. It also increases the production cost slightly; however, the quality is also increased. Going by memory, the pitch of the acme 12mm thread is 1.5 mm for the microadjust. I believe the standard M12 thread pitch is 1.75mm.

My "fourth dimension" support bar position idea is now in my "brilliant, but of very limited use" file. Forum member, Robin C Bailey, invented and made an extended support bar. It has the longest vertical legs of any support bar ever produced. I purchased one from Robin years ago and have found it useful. The vertical legs are long enough to be inserted in the horizontal sleeves from the far side. While this caused excessive water spillage, it actually works very when used dry with diamond or CBN wheels. Although Robin sold these for a reasonable price, the shipping cost from the UK to the US discouraged many sales. It also has no threads. I never found that a problem is actual use, although some thought differently from arm chair thinking.

Ken
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General Tormek Questions / Re: SVD-110
« Last post by Ken S on Yesterday at 06:31:44 pm »
Good one, CB!   :)

Ken
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General Tormek Questions / Re: US-105 vs US-103
« Last post by ega on Yesterday at 05:49:19 pm »
cbwx34:
Thank you.
I have two of the earlier generations of the US and am not familiar with the end stop - perhaps I should be!
I can well see that a longish knife would provide a route for water to spill sideways but wonder whether a chisel or plane iron would create the same problem
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General Tormek Questions / Re: SVD-110
« Last post by cbwx34 on Yesterday at 05:21:40 pm »
Not yet; however, as Curly would say...........

          "Day ain't over"
 
 :D

Ken

It's why I didn't post the rest of the day...  ;)
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General Tormek Questions / Re: US-105 vs US-103
« Last post by cbwx34 on Yesterday at 05:19:24 pm »
Ken S:
Greetings from the UK!
I was puzzled by your saying that "The US-105 is 10mm to allow the end stop to work properly". Can you elaborate, please?
I was surprised that Tormek resorted to the acme thread; I would have thought that a soft-headed pinch screw would suffice to protect the thread.
Tormek say that the US-105 "Can be placed in these positions:

    Vertically for sharpening towards the edge.
    Horizontally for sharpening with the edge.
    Horizontally at the honing wheel side for honing."
I recall your mentioning in another thread that you had tried the "fourth dimension" of horizontally at the rear of the machine and found that water spillage made this otherwise attractive idea impractical.

It probably should be phrased... The US-105 is 10mm longer to allow the end stop to work properly with the wider wheel.

As for  the "fourth dimension" of horizontally at the rear of the machine"... if you hold a knife horizontal and sharpen where the wheel is turning toward the knife/tool, water will quickly build up on the knife and run off to the side.  If you sharpen in the normal position, this is less of an issue (still happens, but not as much). :)
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General Tormek Questions / Re: US-105 vs US-103
« Last post by ega on Yesterday at 12:39:28 pm »
Ken S:
Greetings from the UK!
I was puzzled by your saying that "The US-105 is 10mm to allow the end stop to work properly". Can you elaborate, please?
I was surprised that Tormek resorted to the acme thread; I would have thought that a soft-headed pinch screw would suffice to protect the thread.
Tormek say that the US-105 "Can be placed in these positions:

    Vertically for sharpening towards the edge.
    Horizontally for sharpening with the edge.
    Horizontally at the honing wheel side for honing."
I recall your mentioning in another thread that you had tried the "fourth dimension" of horizontally at the rear of the machine and found that water spillage made this otherwise attractive idea impractical.
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