Author Topic: New SVD-186 Gouge Jig review  (Read 6984 times)

Offline AKMike

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Re: New SVD-186 Gouge Jig review
« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2018, 10:38:13 pm »
If you don't have a bowl gouge yet, or are thinking of adding new bowl gouges to your collection, both Glenn Lucas and Nick Agar recommend gouges with parabolic flutes when using the SVD-186 for sharpening. They claim that it is much easier to get the proper gouge profile on the Tormek with a parabolic flute  than with straight sided V or U shaped flutes.

If you have extra money for your gouges, go with the newer powdered metal gouges, since you have the diamond wheels for sharpening. Cindy Drozda talks about that here: http://www.cindydrozda.com/html/ToolSteel.html

Mike

Offline Ken S

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Re: New SVD-186 Gouge Jig review
« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2018, 02:58:02 am »
Mike,

Thank you for an interesting and informative reply. I think I am an unusual case. I started with and plan to stay with my grandfather's Sears Companion lathe from the 1930s, his set of nine carbon turning tools, and a few newer tools I picked up over the years. While I always bought good tools for the long run in the past, I realize my tool using years are numbered. My longest debate was which Alan Lacer large skew to purchase. I was sorely tempted by his Über model. Superb steel; and a super nice handle hand turned by Alan. The steel is heavier and tapered. This is a superb tool and priced accordingly. When I was younger, I would have bought it. I went with a more practical choice. The regular Alan Lacer skew is made from M2 steel with an ash handle. It is a quality tool made by Hamlet in Sheffield. It costs $125US, half the cost of an Über. It will easily do everything I need without breaking a sweat.

Among my small collection of newer tools is a Doug Thompson 7/16” detail gouge designed by King Heiple. It is powdered metal. My non technical side purchased it because I met King. He was a fine person and an excellent turner.

I agree with you about future gouges. I think powdered metal and super alloys are the coming technology. Thanks for the tip about the parabolic shape. I like Cindy Drozda's videos.

My present bowl gouges (2) are Sorby and Glenn Lucas GL5. My spindle gouge and (2) roughing gouges are also Sorby M2. I did recently purchased a Sorby M2 beading and parting tool. I plan a balance between M2 tools for less frequently used tools and Thompson or D-Way more exotic tools for heavier use. Being a recovering tool junkie, I will probably end up with more turning tools than I really need.

Please share more of what you learned from Glenn and Nick. I am enjoying the four Glenn Lucas DVDs I purchased. I hope he will talk more about the new diamond wheels.

Enough for one reply.

Ken


Offline RichColvin

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Re: New SVD-186 Gouge Jig review
« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2018, 03:42:15 am »
As Bill Boehme said,

“We're probably near the point of examining frog hair when comes to discerning the infinitesimal differences in performance of one exotic steel versus another. I can just barely notice a difference between M2, M4, A11, M42, and some that I'm not sure what they might be.”

I agree.
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Rich Colvin
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You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.

Offline Ken S

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Re: New SVD-186 Gouge Jig review
« Reply #18 on: October 24, 2018, 10:38:18 pm »
Rich,

Interesting comment. I don't think I have enough sharpening experience to pick up the subtle differences. I tend to rely on the expertise of those whose knowledge I respect. I also prefer to spend more on tools which get the heaviest use.

Ken

Offline RichColvin

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Re: New SVD-186 Gouge Jig review
« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2018, 04:10:09 am »
Ken,

My experience is this :   The jump from carbon steel to HSS makes a difference for turning as the HSS stays sharper longer.  But even that is limited.  I see this most prevalently on very hard woods with knotty grain.

I recently saw a video (and can’t find again  :-\) that talked about sharpness, grain size, edge retention, and smoothness of cutting.  Fundamentally, you are right in saying that the craftsman’s skill makes more difference than the steel’s makeup.

Kind regards,
Rich
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Rich Colvin
www.SharpeningHandbook.info - a reference guide for sharpening
www.ColvinTools.com

You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.

Offline AKMike

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Re: New SVD-186 Gouge Jig review
« Reply #20 on: October 25, 2018, 09:41:14 pm »
It certainly is the case that skill makes more of a difference than the tool steel. Turning tools that are sharpened with grinders have to be considered as consumables, and HSS tools just take a little longer to be consumed than high carbon steel tools. For those of us sharpening with Tormeks, however, a turning tool can easily last a lifetime of turning (unless, of course, you are a production turner), particularly if it is made of one of the harder steels. If you are going to have and use a tool for the rest of your life, you might as well go with a good one.

Mike

Offline Ken S

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Re: New SVD-186 Gouge Jig review
« Reply #21 on: October 26, 2018, 03:10:39 am »
Mike,

I remember a billboard advertising an Amish restaurant in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The sign said, "Get to know what good is!"  Good tools can do that, also. In fact, good tools can last more than one lifetime. I have three Stanley Bedrock planes from 1909. (I'm the second owner.) The Bedrocks were the Lie-Nielsens of their day. They are a joy to use.

I see your point, Mike. Most of us do this for pleasure. Turning can be an artistic outlet. I am thrifty in most areas of my life. I allow myself the luxuries of good tools and camera gear.

Ken