Author Topic: T-2 first impression  (Read 3154 times)

Offline WolfY

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T-2 first impression
« on: July 01, 2016, 03:10:35 pm »
So, coming back from Sweden I got the opportunity to test the T-2.

Unfortunately, I had limited time to use it but fortunately it was in the restaurant AG in Stockholm and gave me the chance to talk to them and hear their impression and experience, which I will start with.

They said they sharpen once a week all the knifes. Once in awhile they send for professional treat as they understand it's not the same with the T-2. For daily use they are very happy especially as they don't have to send away their knives and be without them. Avery chef has his own private set and sharpening in place saves them both time and money. All are happy. The T-2 has a coarse and fine grinding wheels. Both are of high quality. It feels. Very even diamond surface even after lots of use. every week about 150 knives at least and couple of months of usage.

And my impression:
It's a light machine, sounds different to the water based one's. But definitely a tormek.
It was weird to use it as I'm use to sharpen against the wheel turn and see the water.

Likes:
Very short learning curve for the user, as only the setting of the angle is needed, and that can be left always the same. They had it at 18dgrs.
Direct use. Stroking the knife a couple of passes on each side is what's needed with the fine wheel, depends on how bad the knife condition. For real damaged knifes or first time in T-2 you need to start with the coarse wheel of course.
Honing is made on compound wheel that don't need any treatment. I didn't put to much time to it but it seems to be working nicely. the angle is a welcome idea saving the worries of touching the leather wheel.
No truing needed. No maintenance. Light weight so it can be stowed away easily. No water spillage and no jigs. No honing compound needed and no messy leather wheel.
From the chef's view it's an easy to learn, on the spot sharpening to very high level, keeping the knives sharp within reach all the time.

Dislike:
Magnet is not collecting all the metal. Knife is full of particles that stick to it every ware. Must be taken of carefully which raise the rise of cutting yourself or having the particles around the kitchen.
Can't see the edge while sharpening with all the consequences like; hard to follow curved shapes, uneven blades etc...
Can't get real sharpness like with the water machines and take little longer time.
Can be used only on kitchen knifes and a like within the limit of 3.5mm and 14~60mm width. But it's OK for most situations so it's not a real problem.
Some knifes can't be sharpened to the near edge of the handle due to limit free pass.

Conclusion:
It's a nice concept that works perfectly for kitchens or sharpening stations for easy, quick and learning free usage. If 80% of the maximum ability to sharpen the knife is OK for you, than the T-2 is very good tool. I can see many places and users that will buy this machine and that would never buy the water based one's.
If Tormek will be able to find a way to add a powerful and easy to clean magnet solution it will be a very nice, and as I see it, unbeatable machine for it's purpose.

Definitely something to look forward to have in the Tormek sharpening system.
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Offline Ken S

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Re: T-2 first impression
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2016, 04:22:20 pm »
Thank you, WolfY.

Excellent and interesting review. At first glance the T2 seems like a T4 on steroids. Like you, I think the smaller size is a good match for restaurants and chefs.

The two diamond grinding wheels: I would think the lighter weight of the T2 is a combination of the T4's smaller size and lighter weight wheels. Yes?

Is there a water trough with the T2? If so, can it be used wet as well as dry?

Would an accessory demagnitizer might help with the particle situation?

The T2 seems a very practical solution to a specific situation. Like the space program, I believe the research put into the T2 will filter down to the real world. The diamond wheels look promising. They may end up as CBN for everyday use. The honing wheel seems intriguing. Like the grinding wheels, the honing wheel might be interchangeable with today's Tormeks.

I believe the Tormek future will be most interesting. We may start seeing SuperGrinds with space age components!

Ken

Offline SharpenADullWitt

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Re: T-2 first impression
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2016, 07:25:27 pm »
So would you for instance, say it might be comparable to using a Tormek, T-4, with the SJ stone and a fixed jig? (verses being able to use the regular stone and adjusting for knife wear)
Favorite line, from a post here:
8)

Yeah you know Tormek have reached sharpening nirvana when you get a prosthetic hand as part of the standard package :/)

Offline WolfY

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Re: T-2 first impression
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2016, 10:57:33 am »
So would you for instance, say it might be comparable to using a Tormek, T-4, with the SJ stone and a fixed jig? (verses being able to use the regular stone and adjusting for knife wear)
Well, I'm not even sure it's right to compare the 2 different models unless you only sharpen knives.
The limits of the T-2 is there.
But, if you sharpens knives for 100% and and don't care about anything than a sharp working knife as easy and fast as possible, then the T-2 is a great choice. I can't wait till Tormek will have them on export as it would be IMHO "chef's choice" product of the year.
But if you are not chef and need an all round model that can do more than knives the T-4/8 are the choices.

Though it would be interesting to test the new compound wheel on long run (on T-4/7) and compare it to the leather wheel.
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Offline Ken S

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Re: T-2 first impression
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2016, 09:53:37 pm »
Many years ago, Tormek offered the EA-240 De-burring Wheel which interchanged with the Leather Honing Wheel. While these are long out of production, they, and the compound honing wheel on the T2 may be harbingers of things to come from Sweden.

I do not expect the highly specialized T2 to be mass marketed. However, I will not be surprised to see some of its features appear as accessories for existing Tormek models in the not too distant future. (I have no inside information about this. It is strictly a gut feeling.)

Ken

Offline WolfY

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Re: T-2 first impression
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2016, 03:23:22 pm »
Ken,

On the contrary to you, I really think the T-2 has it's market and it's big. I hope they will solve the magnet issue a.s.a.p.

I hope Tormek will develop same jig for the T-4/7 series with wheel dia. adjustment.

By the way to add another like I forgot, is that the T-2 is ready for use in zero time. Just take it up from the shelf and use, then stove it away and forget. No worries about water or jigs. I also think a larger version, more stable and heavy could also find a use at customers that have lots of knives and need fast and easy sharpening couple of times a day. For example butchers. 
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Offline SharpenADullWitt

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Re: T-2 first impression
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2016, 04:41:57 pm »
So would you for instance, say it might be comparable to using a Tormek, T-4, with the SJ stone and a fixed jig? (verses being able to use the regular stone and adjusting for knife wear)
Well, I'm not even sure it's right to compare the 2 different models unless you only sharpen knives.
The limits of the T-2 is there.
But, if you sharpens knives for 100% and and don't care about anything than a sharp working knife as easy and fast as possible, then the T-2 is a great choice. I can't wait till Tormek will have them on export as it would be IMHO "chef's choice" product of the year.
But if you are not chef and need an all round model that can do more than knives the T-4/8 are the choices.

Though it would be interesting to test the new compound wheel on long run (on T-4/7) and compare it to the leather wheel.

My friends restaurant is exactly the reason I was asking this.  I also live next to a now retired professional chef, and have another retired chef I am friends with.  Something quick and easy would allow them to do them more often, rather then "mind if I trouble you" type of things.  They have actually asked me to keep my eyes out for some basic, maintenance stuff, that is relatively fool resistant. (I showed him and used my Lansky pocket sharpener on a knife, but it is the wrong angles for a lot of their knives)
Favorite line, from a post here:
8)

Yeah you know Tormek have reached sharpening nirvana when you get a prosthetic hand as part of the standard package :/)

Offline stevebot

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Re: T-2 first impression
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2016, 10:30:19 pm »
Two Tormek T-2 videos:

Tormek-T2 Knivslip - YouTube
Video for tormek t-2▶ 1:03
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIQBB9J_GM0
Nov 2, 2015 - Uploaded by Martin Servera
Tormek-T2 Knivslip är enkel att använda och skonsam för knivbladet. Håkan Matseus, Kökschef på ...

Tormek T-2 Instruktionsfilm - YouTube
Video for tormek t-2▶ 3:43
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhA4uG9MUPU
Apr 14, 2016 - Uploaded by Tormek-ProKitchen
Kort instruktionsfilm som visar hur du kommer igång med din Tormek T-2 knivslipmaskin. Filmen går även ...
Steve Bottorff; author, teacher and consultant on knife and scissor sharpening.

Offline Ken S

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Re: T-2 first impression
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2016, 02:52:02 am »
Interesting videos, Steve. I hope we may someday have the option of purchasing the knife jig, angled honing wheel and (perhaps) the diamond wheel as add ons. The knife jig looks like it might fir on a standard universal support. I would be surprised if the tapered honing wheel could not interchange with the leather honing wheel on the T4.

I hope the test marketing goes well in Sweden.

Ken

Offline Ken S

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Re: T-2 first impression
« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2016, 01:22:33 pm »
WolfY,

I have been thinking about your review. I have no restaurant experience except for working in a diner in college. Back then, the owner sent half of his knives out to be professionally sharpened every other week. Every knife was sharpened in this two week cycle. I don't know if this two week cycle was for the sharpness need of the knives or for the convenience of the sharpener's business schedule.

With the chefs using the T2, would full sharpening be necessary every week? Or, would occasional sharpening and regular honing be sufficient? I understand that health regulations might mandate a cutting board surface which would dull the edges more rapidly than my wooden cutting board.

Thanks again for posting your T2 review.

Ken

Offline SharpenADullWitt

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Re: T-2 first impression
« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2016, 05:50:20 pm »
That knife jig would only work with a fixed reference point to the wheel and a wheel that doesn't wear from that point. (otherwise one of the old wood blocks for our wheel and a consistent setup)
That model appears to have the zinc top and plastic body but with possibly more sealed sides, for cleaning purposes.  Not the stainless one that I read Jeff Faris once mention (think model 4000, sold only in Europe years ago). (wouldn't be in a butchers area, but shop.  Butchers area's pretty much get hosed down)
I would be interested to know what, other then shape, is the honing wheel difference?  (is it impregnated with polish from the factory, or a different material)

My experience with chef's is either they tend to hone nightly or every other, and the commercial sharpeners generally have presets that sharpen rather then hone. (may vary time across the wheel, but don't go straight to honing without them sharpening first).  If one didn't send them out they could hone them when they thought they were just beginning to lose the edge.  The cycles probably coinside as well with sharpeners routes (they like to keep busy).
One day in a commercial kitchen, is probably closer to a week or two of using a knife at home, if one cooks at home a lot.  There are still wood cutting surfaces in commercial kitchens but most have gone to plastic (close to equal hardness of the plastic, but less porous for cleaning purposes).
« Last Edit: July 12, 2016, 06:00:03 pm by SharpenADullWitt »
Favorite line, from a post here:
8)

Yeah you know Tormek have reached sharpening nirvana when you get a prosthetic hand as part of the standard package :/)

Offline Ken S

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Re: T-2 first impression
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2016, 04:57:19 pm »
I can understand the marketing appeal of the T2 being usable by anyone on the restaurant staff with very little training.

I would add a caution. I remember a comment in an old cooking book that said knives should be treated with as much respect as the best silver; they are as valuable. Unless the chef, owner, or someone on the staff is already experienced with using a Tormek, I would seek out a dealer who is also a very experienced Tormek sharpener and teacher. In the US, Steve Bottorff comes to mind. In the UK, I would contact Robin Bailey. If working with either of these two is not possible, I would use them as standards and look for someone with similar credentials. Your fine cutlery will thank you.

Ken