Author Topic: Boy Scout Jamboree  (Read 2258 times)

Offline stevebot

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Boy Scout Jamboree
« on: July 25, 2017, 12:55:11 am »
I spent an interesting day last week at the Boy Scout Jamboree at Bechtel Summit Reservation in WV. Scouts have a large property there, and it is capable of hosting 40,000 scouts and their leaders for Jamboree. I was there representing my publisher, Knife World, and we shared a booth with Klecker Knives.

Logistics were amazing. With so many people the only access was by shuttle bus, and the BSA must have chartered every bus in WV. Vendors parked at the new Ruby Welcome Center near Mt. Hope and we were bused 30 minutes to the site. Vendors were arranged along one side of a football size grassy area, concessions were along the other side, and the far end had an amphitheater for events.  Troops were arrayed in a semi-circle around this central area.

I brought a Tormek T-4 and a bag of small tools. I demonstrated sharpening to anyone who would listen, but most boys (and their leaders) just wanted me to sharpen their knife.  Many were brand new scout knives bought from the trading post across the way. I ground primary bevels freehand with the Tormek, knocked off the burr on a Spyderco Sharpmaker to save stropping time, then finished on the leather wheel. One scout timed me at 1:10 for his knife.

Speaking of scout knives, Knife World pulled off a very nice thing. The July issue of Knife Magazine has a 1928 Remington Heroism knife on the cover and a story inside about its history. This is one of the rarest collectible knives out there. KW gave away 3000 copies of the magazine. They even had a copy of the October 1928 Boy's Life on display that covered that years presentations of the knives.

Two final observations on the T-4. The handle is inadequate - sharp edged and off the center of gravity. It is a bitch to carry any distance. And the small size makes it hard to strop anything larger than a pocket knife. T-8 next time for sure.
Steve Bottorff; author, teacher and consultant on knife and scissor sharpening.

Offline cbwx34

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Re: Boy Scout Jamboree
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2017, 04:10:16 am »
Sounds like a busy day.  I think it’s good you pointed out how quickly you can get the job done... many describe the Tormek as “too slow”.

Need to talk you (or someone around you) to shoot some video.  Bet it would’ve been interesting.

Thanks for sharing.  (Knife mag. info sounds interesting too).
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Offline Ken S

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Re: Boy Scout Jamboree
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2017, 12:36:22 pm »
Steve,

A most interesting post. I am pleased to read that you are continuing to share your extensive knife sharpening experience. Among my life treasures is my Cub Scout knife, a gift from my grandparents sixty years ago.

I will look more closely at my T4. My preferred carry method is with the grinding wheel removed and everything placed in a bowling ball bag. The grinding wheel, in its box, is placed flat in the bottom of the bag. The T4 sits on top of the boxed grinding wheel. (For more regular, long term use, something like a Rubbermaid or Tupperware continer would work better; the wheel may have retained dampness.) There is plenty of room in the bag for Tormek accessories, including a Spyderco Sharpmaker. It is surprisingly comfortable to carry with the shoulder strap, and only cost $32.

I will check into fairing the edges of my handle.

I replaced the nuts on both ends of my T4 shaft. They both seem adequate for general use, however, I frequently remove both the grinding wheel and the leather honing wheel. (I have four grinding wheels and two leather honing wheels for my T4.) Except for being slightly shorter, the EZYlock shaft on the T4 is identical to the T7/8 version. The heavier steel EZYlock nut and the quick release nut for the leather honing wheel are both perfect fits. I replaced both. I should state that neither failed; the quick release is more convenient and the steel EZYlock seems more durable.

As I recall, the T2, a very specialized model designed for restaurant use, uses a tapered wheel in place of the leather honing wheel. I will look into the possibility of adapting the larger T7/8 leather honing wheel to the T4.

Have you tried using the extra fine rods with the Spyderco?

Steve, I think your BSA day offers valuable field trial for anyone interested in using the Tormek in a camp environment. Having watched you sharpen, I find your 1:10 time both believable and sustainable.

Ken

Offline stevebot

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Re: Boy Scout Jamboree
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2017, 05:52:05 am »
Ken, Thanks for the bowling ball bag trick. Now that I see how few of the tools I carried in my Gatemouth were actually used I may convert. 
Curtis, I will check with Klecker knives and see if they caught me on any videos.
My experience at farmer's markets is that I can maintain an under 2 min time all morning, i.e. 120 knives in 4 hours, including scissors and garden tools.
Steve Bottorff; author, teacher and consultant on knife and scissor sharpening.

Offline Jan

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Re: Boy Scout Jamboree
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2017, 03:19:38 pm »
I am large fan of the Scout Movement, but I was surprised by the info that the individual participant Jamboree fee for 2017 was $975 for youth participants.  ;)
« Last Edit: July 26, 2017, 03:21:12 pm by Jan »

Offline Airplanedoc

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Re: Boy Scout Jamboree
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2017, 07:58:27 pm »
Remember the $975 does not include travel to and from the jamboree or spending money while there. 

I was fortunate to be in a troop that did really well at fund raising.   In my 5 or so years in Scouts we went to Canada for summer camp,  Eglin AFB for a week, and 2 weeks at Philmont, and went on a monthly weekend camping trip all that time.  Our fund raising efforts subsidized everyone's expenses so it was a reasonable expense for even those that not so easily afford the big trips.  When I went to Philmont in the early 90's I believe it was $675 per scout + travel and spending money.    Amtrack gave my troop a entire private car from St Louis to New Mexico.