Author Topic: Uneven edge on 3/8" bowl gouge  (Read 2839 times)

Offline tahodgson

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Intermediate woodturner
    • View Profile
Uneven edge on 3/8" bowl gouge
« on: March 03, 2018, 05:19:04 pm »
I think I know the answer: I'm not rotating the tool evenly against the stone.
What techniques do you all have for ensuring an even edge? Is it just the obvious, swing slowly back and forth as if it were a metronome in slow motion?

Thanks, guys and gals,

~TH

Offline AKMike

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 62
  • I'm a sharp craftsman!
    • View Profile
Re: Uneven edge on 3/8" bowl gouge
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2018, 03:34:21 am »
You don't say what kind of profile you are trying to achieve with your gouge, but, in general, it is better to not swing the gouge back and forth. When you do that, the nose gets doubly ground and you wind up with a bird's beak. Work on one side and then the other, keeping them even. Then, grind the nose of the gouge, blending into the sides.

Mike

Offline Ken S

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6925
    • View Profile
Re: Uneven edge on 3/8" bowl gouge
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2018, 10:47:16 am »
Thomas,

You ask an excellent question. I am not an active turner, however, I have done enough gouge and skew sharpening and reshaping to recognize that Mike's advice is solid. Mike has studied with Nick Agar and Glenn Lucas, two world class turners.

I have long thought the combination of the TTS-100 turning tool setter and the SVD 185 gouge jig (now superceded by the much improved SVD-186) are Tormek's most advanced combination setting tool and jig. They make accurate and repeatable set up automatic. They are both consistent and very versatile.

The variable the jig does not control is the amount of grinding. Unlike a bench chisel, which presents a uniform amount of grinding surface, the eliptical shape of a turning gouge presents different amounts of grinding surface throughout the arc. This is the same with any jig or freehand. With careful observation and practice, you soon learn to adapt and will become proficient. A small amount of tool length used in learning will be much rewarded over time.

At the risk of sounding like a Tormek salesman, I would highly recommend the Tormek TNT-300 Turner's Information Box. This kit includes a book by Torgny Jansson, inventor of the Tormek, and a DVD by Jeff Farris, a longtime Tormek associate, and the founding moderator of this forum. Jeff is a very experienced turner and during his many years with Tormek was one of the most experienced Tormek people on the planet. The DVD has two parts. One part gives detailed sharpening coaching; the second part gives good actual turning instruction for the individual tools. I consider this kit Tormek's premiere learning resource. I think should be an active part of every Tormek turner's reference resources. The DVD goes well beyond the website videos.

My other recommendation is to do a member search for jeff farris on this forum. Jeff made around 1300 posts. I have learned a lot by reading Jeff's posts. They are enjoyable and informative.

Please keep learning and keep posting. You are among friends.

Ken

Offline AKMike

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 62
  • I'm a sharp craftsman!
    • View Profile
Re: Uneven edge on 3/8" bowl gouge
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2018, 10:18:36 pm »
Ken,

I very much agree with your contention that the TTS-100 and SVD-185/6 combination is Tormek's best. When you can perfectly resharpen a gouge in 30 seconds (60 seconds if you want to hone), it doesn't get much better. Imagine if there was something similar for the knife sharpeners.

I also second your recommendation of the TNT-300.

Mike

Offline Ken S

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6925
    • View Profile
Re: Uneven edge on 3/8" bowl gouge
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2018, 01:05:56 pm »
Thomas,

I found a very good video done by Nick Agar for Tormek on facebook (August 2, 2017). Nick spends more time shaping and sharpening the wings. The entire swing is just a finishing movement.

Ken

Offline Wyo6050

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • I'm a sharp craftsman!
    • View Profile
Re: Uneven edge on 3/8" bowl gouge
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2018, 05:37:01 am »
Hi Everyone,  I've been trying to read through a lot of the threads in this forum since I am new to it and wanted to see if my questions were asked before.  Im still reading but I saw this thread and thought I'd offer my experience.

I've been turning a few years now and I have noticed that some tools' flutes are not ground equally.  I don't think it was asked, but what brand of tools do you have?  It could be your tools.  I'll admit I have Benjamins Best- I'll get my money's worth by the amount of sharpening I'm investing and then I'll replace them with higher quality.  I have a few of each of their sizes (3/4, 1/2, 3/8's I think?)  and each one has a different flute than the other.  I can see the difference in the bevels and wings when I sharpen them too.  The factory grind was largely off too.  I'm still shaping away patches of the original grinds in many of my tools.

I've just learned to get them as close to symmetrical as possible, but I keep in mind that I only use one wing or bevel at a time so symmetrical wings are more for looks.  It hasn't been an issue with turning- or requiring changes of turning techniques.

Offline RichColvin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 733
  • Ornamental Turner
    • View Profile
    • SharpeningHandbook.info
Re: Uneven edge on 3/8" bowl gouge
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2018, 04:52:12 pm »
Wyo6050,

I’ve been turning about 20 years, but very part time (when I get some time to do it — after work, family, ...).  I agree on the symmetry note you made.  I more focus and on not letting the wings be concave or too convex, and on a smooth transition from one side, around the nose, to the other.

I too only make a full swing on the final pass.

Kind regards,
Rich
---------------------------
Rich Colvin
www.SharpeningHandbook.info - a reference guide for sharpening
www.ColvinTools.com

You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.