Author Topic: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?  (Read 2000 times)

Offline Y-Not

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • I'm a sharp craftsman!
    • View Profile
Just wondering.
Mine has some chalk looking stuff on part of the grinding surface.  I can't feel it and it didn't come off while soaking the wheel (while spinning).
Not as sharp as I once was but I'm as sharp once as I ever was.

Offline cbwx34

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1260
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2018, 12:35:29 am »
Just wondering.
Mine has some chalk looking stuff on part of the grinding surface.  I can't feel it and it didn't come off while soaking the wheel (while spinning).

I don't know what the "chalk looking stuff" is... but I wouldn't true it (unless it needs it).  You might practice a bit with the Stone Grader... seeing what the coarse and fine feels (and cuts) like over the next couple of practice days... this should also remove whatever the "chalk stuff" is.

Offline Y-Not

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • I'm a sharp craftsman!
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2018, 12:40:40 am »
I sort of answered my own question.  I set up the truing jig to where it was just touching the stone. I backed it off about 1/8th of a turn. Rotated the stone and found that it touches in some places and it doesn't in other places.  Seems that the stone is just a wee bit out of round. I'll dork around with it more once I've read through the manual.
Not as sharp as I once was but I'm as sharp once as I ever was.

Offline wootz

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 491
    • View Profile
    • knifeGrinders.com.au
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2018, 03:06:53 am »
I haven't seen a single Tormek wheel out of the box that wouldn't require truing before use - new they are slightly out of round.
Y-Not, this thread on truing is also worth a glance
https://www.tormek.com/forum/index.php?topic=3053.msg16372#msg16372

And one more remark, Stig advises against too shallow truing as this may cause deepening of the grooves left by the truing tip. The minimum truing depth should be as in the Tormek handbook.
(Stig is a Tormek representative in the USA)

Offline Ken S

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6050
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2018, 03:28:05 am »
One good carry over from the dry grinder world is the practice of initially truing grinding wheels. I think it is a good idea, although I confess that I have not always been diligent about it.

You state that you found the truing cut touched in some places and not in others. You are heading in the right direction. I have often posted about my belief in the value of light frequent truing. I like to start with the diamond only kissing the high spots and advancing around half of a microadjust number for very light cuts. Once a light cut touches the entire wheel, you are finished.

Once you are comfortable doing this, you can make deeper, quicker cuts (for example, during Saturday mornings if absolutely necessary. Better to true the wheel at the end of the session before Saturday.) This is another lesson I learned the hard way. I realized that my grinding wheel was out of true while working by myself demonstrating the Tormek at a woodworking show! Be kind to yourself; be prepared.

(Don't forget to enjoy your new Tormek.  :)

Ken

ps to Wootz:

Excellent post. I have bookmarked the topic you referenced. I hate to disagree with Stig, however, I have had no trouble with very light cuts. Do whatever works for you.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2018, 03:35:40 am by Ken S »

Offline Y-Not

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • I'm a sharp craftsman!
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2018, 03:34:30 am »
I haven't seen a single Tormek wheel out of the box that wouldn't require truing before use - new they are slightly out of round.
Y-Not, this thread on truing is also worth a glance
https://www.tormek.com/forum/index.php?topic=3053.msg16372#msg16372

And one more remark, Stig advises against too shallow truing as this may cause deepening of the grooves left by the truing tip. The minimum truing depth should be as in the Tormek handbook.
(Stig is a Tormek representative in the USA)

That was sort of my assumption before I even opened the box.  Sort of like car tires.  Not a single one is truly "round". There's a process for truing tires that very much the same as truing grinding wheels and it too makes a BIG difference.

But we are not here to talk about tires.

I trued it.  That got rid of the chalky garbage that was on the wheel.
Thankfully I've seen enough videos and I knew enough to RTFM before getting started.  I ran the truing jig over the stone 8 times.  The first setting was just to take off the very highest spots.  The next adjustment was just to make sure that I had an even truing. First pass was rather slow.  About 90 seconds like the manual said. The pass back to the beginning was a little faster. About 30 seconds. Again, as the manual stated.  I then did two more passes just to humor myself. The pass back and forth yielded almost no contact with the stone. 

I then grabbed a rust old chisel. Measured my angle. Set it up in the jig. Set the grind height. Used a black marker to make sure I was grinding just the face.  I started with the course then dressed the stone to the fine grit.  Followed that with the leather wheel.

So far, I'm rather happy with the results.  I've gotten sharp chisels in the past.  But I've never had one as shiny as this.
Not as sharp as I once was but I'm as sharp once as I ever was.

Offline Ken S

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6050
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2018, 03:42:54 am »
Nice polished bevels, however, the rest of the chisels could benefit from a set of these:

http://www.leevalley.com/us/garden/page.aspx?p=10509&cat=2,42194,40727

I keep a set of these in my tool chest and have used them frequently.  :)

Ken

Offline Y-Not

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • I'm a sharp craftsman!
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2018, 06:16:30 am »
Nice polished bevels, however, the rest of the chisels could benefit from a set of these:

http://www.leevalley.com/us/garden/page.aspx?p=10509&cat=2,42194,40727

I keep a set of these in my tool chest and have used them frequently.  :)

Ken

True on both counts.
How do the Rust Erasers compare to wet sanding?
I've used wet sanding to remove rust from hatches, machetes and the like then followed that up with good rubbing of Mother's metal polish.
If the Rust Erasers do as good if not better job and do not require water, that's right up my alley for the market.
Not as sharp as I once was but I'm as sharp once as I ever was.

Offline Ken S

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6050
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2018, 11:44:42 am »
I really have not done wet sanding (except for things like chisel back flattening/polishing), so I really can't compare. However, the set of three rust erasers I have had for over twenty years has served me very well. I use them mostly for staining and light surface rust. Having three grits is very convenient.

If I would ever decide to be a weekend warrior sharpening at a farmers market, I would be sure to have a set with me. They make quick work of dressing up a knife or tool which looks a but under the weather.

In your case, my gut feeling would be to retain your wet sanding experience and complement it with a set of rust erasers. Why not have the best of both worlds?

Ken

Offline Y-Not

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • I'm a sharp craftsman!
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2018, 12:06:49 pm »
In your case, my gut feeling would be to retain your wet sanding experience and complement it with a set of rust erasers. Why not have the best of both worlds?

Ken

I'm going to look into getting a set of the Rust Erasers.
I'm treating this FM adventure as I would when I go camping.
I'd much rather have it and not need it than to need it and NOT have it.

The erasers are inexpensive enough to add to the arsenal. Might as well have them in case.
My only issue with wet sanding is the mess that it generates.  That mess is one thing in your own driveway.  It's another beast while trying to do it at a market.
Not as sharp as I once was but I'm as sharp once as I ever was.

Offline Ken S

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6050
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #10 on: April 12, 2018, 12:33:12 pm »
Reduce your mess by getting a turkey baster ro remove most of the water from your trough. The redesigned T8 water trough with removable magnet and scraper works very well. Practice pivoting your trough to remove it. It is easy once you master the skill(only a very few focused minutes).

The T8 trough also uses less water, a nice touch.

Ken

Offline Y-Not

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • I'm a sharp craftsman!
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2018, 02:11:04 pm »
Reduce your mess by getting a turkey baster ro remove most of the water from your trough. The redesigned T8 water trough with removable magnet and scraper works very well. Practice pivoting your trough to remove it. It is easy once you master the skill(only a very few focused minutes).

The T8 trough also uses less water, a nice touch.

Ken

Oddly enough, that was one thing that concerned me about the T8. I had visions of fighting with the trough to get it off and flinging water all over the place.  I'm not sure if it's just my system or what but once the trough has been lowed, just a slight upward lift and slide and it comes off. No problem. No mess.

I mean, there's still water-o-plenty spread about during the sharpening process.  Most is recaptured by the water chute or by the design of the housing so that water is routed back into the trough.  But still...There's going to be water dripping here and there.  None of that troubles me.  I just didn't want to spill a bunch of nasty looking trough water all over the parking lot/grass area that I'll be set up.
Not as sharp as I once was but I'm as sharp once as I ever was.

Offline cbwx34

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1260
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #12 on: April 12, 2018, 03:05:31 pm »
...
I trued it.  That got rid of the chalky garbage that was on the wheel.
Thankfully I've seen enough videos and I knew enough to RTFM before getting started.  I ran the truing jig over the stone 8 times.  The first setting was just to take off the very highest spots.  The next adjustment was just to make sure that I had an even truing. First pass was rather slow.  About 90 seconds like the manual said. The pass back to the beginning was a little faster. About 30 seconds. Again, as the manual stated.  I then did two more passes just to humor myself. The pass back and forth yielded almost no contact with the stone. 
...

Glad you got it taken care of.  I personally don't believe that small imperfections OOTB necessarily need to be 'fixed', but in this case you killed two birds with one stone. he he  :D

Offline Y-Not

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • I'm a sharp craftsman!
    • View Profile
Re: Should I true my grinding stone before using it for the first time?
« Reply #13 on: April 12, 2018, 03:56:21 pm »
in this case you killed two birds with one stone. he he  :D

I saw what you did there. ???

Technically speaking, I killed two birds with two stones (ginding and truing).

Regardless, those birds are dead and gone and I've move onward.  :)
Not as sharp as I once was but I'm as sharp once as I ever was.