Author Topic: diamond wheels, first attempt  (Read 4557 times)

Offline Grizz

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2018, 05:08:55 pm »
Ken, I was wondering if the DE wheel leaves a smooth polished surface or a toothy surface ?

Offline Ken S

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #16 on: June 11, 2018, 07:23:43 pm »
Grizz, I will post as soon as as I test it I will post. In the meantime, maybe our friend from Norway will post.

Ken

Offline Tullamann

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2018, 07:36:55 pm »
I think my DE-250 needs more break-in time because the scratch pattern is a little to "heavy" for my taste, I like polished edges.
The edge in the picture is around 0,75mm wide, knife is a Gerber Sportsman V-Steel (1980) sharpened on DF-250, DE-250 and honed on Tormek leather wheel.
BESS 103.
Sorry for crappy picture, I only have a cheap eBay microscope.

Cheers,
TM

Offline wootz

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2018, 06:18:43 am »
Interesting photo. Scratches look pretty much like after mine broke-in #1000 CBN, but I have to say that in the beginning this CBN wheel was like #800, so I see a pattern here.

Offline Ken S

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #19 on: August 09, 2018, 10:14:53 pm »
My schedule has allowed time to use the new diamond wheels in small doses. Most recently, completed today, I reshaped a turning skew, This involved extensive work with the DC-250 360 grit wheel. The project took most of a week, due mostly to my inexperience with sharpening turning tools. I did notice that as my technique improved, the wheel cut better.The non changing wheel diameter gets most of the press. However, what really stands out to me is the grinding sound. The diamond wheels start out with a good grinding sound. Unlike the SG and, in my experience, the SB, that healthy grinding sound and feel does not lessen. (After the initial breaking in period)

I have not had a chance to sharpen knives with the diamond wheels. My experiences with the skew chisel is very positive.

Ken

Offline RickKrung

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt / Excessive Water Spillage
« Reply #20 on: September 14, 2018, 05:58:03 pm »
I have all three diamond wheels now and have been using them more.  I am experiencing what I consider excessive water spillage when using them, compared to the stone wheels.  With the stones, there is always some water spillage, mostly collecting in the swivel base and sometimes spilling onto the table or stool that the machine is on.  But nothing like what I'm seeing with the diamond wheels. 

It is annoying in its own right, having to mop up that much water and being careful about what is in its path that could be damaged, but it is concerning how much of the ACC laced water is "consumed".  For my last farmers market gig, I started with a pint (16oz/473ml) and came home with a cup (8oz/236ml) and I really didn't sharpen that much (that's another story).  That is one whole dose of 10ml of the ACC lost to spillage, and that is happening just about every time I use the diamond wheels.  At 25 "doses" per bottle and $20 per bottle, that could amount to $20 per month with regular usage.  That seems excessive also.  (More on the order of $10/mo. at my usage rate.)





This is not the same as what Ken S posted about previously, "slinging" out of the trough. This is water that rides up on the blade and either drops off on the case to the left or directly onto the bench beyond the trough to the right.  I put the drip guard on to catch the spillage on the right, but have not done anything about it on the left.  And this is happening with medium sized knives (6"/152mm).

It seems there is a lot of water that rides along the edge of the knife after is passed over the diamond wheels and drops off.  I've tried tilting the knife a little to try to get the water to drain back onto the wheel, but that is not all that effective.  I've also tried lowering the trough so only a little bit of the wheel is immersed, but it quickly "runs out of water" and goes dry, requiring the trough to be raised or more ACC water added and that doesn't wet the side of the wheel much at all. 

I believe this is not a matter of the machine being out of level.  It is on a level table, on either my (nearly) level garage floor or a level concrete sidewalk.  Both of those surfaces have to have some slope, but it is very minor ~ 1%.  If those aren't level enough, then there is a machine design flaw, IMHO. 

I'm seriously considering fabricating a drip guard to put over the case that would direct the spillage back into the trough, but there isn't much space down between the wheel/case/trough and it would have to extend over the upper lip of the trough as it is raised and lowered.  A modestly tricky feat.  A thicker backing spacer could be used, but dang it, that just shouldn't be necessary. 

Has anyone else found anything similar and I hope there will be good ideas on what is happening and what can be done about it?

Rick
« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 06:19:18 pm by RickKrung »
Quality is like buying oats.  If you want nice clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

Offline cbwx34

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2018, 07:58:25 pm »
This has bugged me to (with the regular stone).  I've had better luck keeping it under control by tipping the knife slightly sometimes (not really a good solution), and by slowing down the travel across the stone, giving the water a 'chance' to run off the knife back down the stone, and not across and onto the machine.  If you try this and pay attention... you'll notice the faster you move a knife across the stone... the more water seems to flow onto the machine.

The old Supergrind models were elevated on one side to help the water flow back to the outside... might try that.  (I know it's been talked about before, but couldn't find it).

If you type  spillage  in the search box... you'll find several threads... so it's definitely an issue.  In one, I found this idea that I posted before (made by someone else)...

https://www.instagram.com/p/BEnC8BPgCgU/

... (since you like to build stuff).  ;)
« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 08:20:16 pm by cbwx34 »

Offline Ken S

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #22 on: September 15, 2018, 04:02:55 pm »
I first started measuring the amount if water I put into the trough when I tried using CBN wheels wet with Honerite Gold on my Tormek. Ignore the water level lines on the water trough when using CBN ir diamond wheels; they are designed for the Original (absorbtive) wheels.

By measuring, I learned that the water efficient T8 water trough required 125ml of water (+ 6ml of either Honerite Gold or Tormek ACC). I have not experienced more than a little spillage with that amount if water. The longest knife I have ever sharpened is is eight inches (200mm). I have never used the attachment for long knives. I am sure that I should use it; I have just never felt the need to use it.

I suspect my passes are done more slowly than other users.

I will observe my future use more carefully. For the present, I suspect the spillage problem may be caused by overfilling.

Incidentally, reusing the water plus ACC does not seem to cause problems. My plan is to first reuse it a few times with the diamond wheels and then, before discarding it, to use it with an Original wheel.

Ken

Offline RickKrung

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #23 on: September 15, 2018, 04:20:26 pm »
...snip...
Incidentally, reusing the water plus ACC does not seem to cause problems. My plan is to first reuse it a few times with the diamond wheels and then, before discarding it, to use it with an Original wheel.

Ken

With a smile, I can say that I am reusing "what ACC laced water" remains after a session.  I put it in a yogurt container to let whatever settle and then pour it off to a cup sized Mason jar and let it settle again. 

Rick
Quality is like buying oats.  If you want nice clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

Offline cbwx34

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #24 on: September 15, 2018, 05:20:58 pm »
With a smile, I can say that I am reusing "what ACC laced water" remains after a session.  I put it in a yogurt container to let whatever settle and then pour it off to a cup sized Mason jar and let it settle again. 

Rick

From what I hear... "yogurt knife sharpening" might appeal to some areas of Oregon... ;)

Offline stevebot

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #25 on: September 16, 2018, 04:23:03 pm »
If you are ready to get into diamond wheels, here is a deal. Tormek is running a 10% off sale on accessories, I find that I am overstocked on the Diamond wheels and need to clear out a few sets. Go to:
https://sharpeningmadeeasy.com/student.htm
There you will find sale prices plus additional student discounts. Continental USA only.

Student discounts are refunds of fees I have collected from my students and refunding them does not violate Tormek pricing policy as long as I do not advertise them. This webpage is unlisted, please do not share it outside this forum.
Steve Bottorff; author, teacher and consultant on knife and scissor sharpening.

Offline Ken S

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #26 on: September 16, 2018, 04:45:18 pm »
Do not overlook the listing on Steve's website for his Sharpening School video. I have always thought it was a bargain at the original full price. I would not pass up this price for this excellent training aid.

Ken

Offline RickKrung

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Re: diamond wheels, first attempt
« Reply #27 on: September 17, 2018, 04:21:31 pm »
...snip...
From what I hear... "yogurt knife sharpening" might appeal to some areas of Oregon... ;)

Yes, but that is definitely NOT Halfway Ore. even Baker County. 

Portland, Eugene, Ashland and Bend, yes:
Portland - just eclectic and "weird",
Eugene - dominated by a liberal state university and the "hippie-center" of the state,
Ashland - Shakespeare theatrical center and "border-town" to California and
Bend - assimilated by the Borg-California

 8)
Quality is like buying oats.  If you want nice clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.