In the Shop > Wood Carving

SVS-50 advice please

(1/3) > >>

jwl940:
Hallo all

I am a long time user of a Supergrind 2000 for sharpening turning gouges with a lot of repeatable success, can’t think of a better / safer way of sharpening.  Having very recently been introduced to carving I picked up a handful of well loved carving gouges at a car boot just to practice sharpening those before attempting the same on new expensive ones.  Using the SVS-38 I immediately succeeded in bring the various curved gouges back to life,  it couldn’t have been easier.  Using the SVS-50 and its closed seat a half inch single bevel straight gouge was reprofiled to a 70 degree skew double bevel, once again a very simple process taking all of 30 minutes.  However, there’s always a however.  Given the length (or lack of) the gouge (it had been well used over many decades) I was only able to get a 40 degree bevel on it where I was looking for something nearer 20 degrees.  Either I have discovered a limitation with the jig or my technique is flaky so the exam question is simply which, the jig or me?

Having successfully profiled (almost) that straight gouge into a skew I next tried to tackle a 3/8 inch straight gouge but immediately found the closed seat wouldn’t grip the blade, it was too narrow for the side screw to reach.  I understand this jig has been updated and rereleased so this exam question is, 'will the latest SVS-50 Closed Seat housing grip a 3/8th inch wide blade.

Hope all this makes sense, grateful for any advice.

John

RichColvin:
John,

Some pictures would certainly help, but my experience with short tools (e.g., veining tools) was that the standard jigs would not work.  I’ve used a collar for those.  You can see pictures on my www.SharpeningHandbook.info site.

Kind regards,
Rich

RichColvin:
John,

Also, the new chisel jigs (SE-76 and SE-77) are significantly improved over the older SVH-60 jig.  I use the SE-77 on my small carving chisels, including the skewed ones.

That may also be a better solution for you than trying to use the SVS-50 Multi-Jig.

Kind regards,
Rich

jwl940:
Thanks for the replies Rich, that’s certainly an impressive web site.  I’m away from my shed for the rest of the week so can’t get any photos of what I’m trying to achieve but if you look at a pfeil 1s that is what I’m attempting to get albeit with a 70degree angle.  Would the SE-77 do that bearing in mind the 1s is double bevelled and skewed or will the re-released svs-50 grip down to 3/8 inch - 9.5mm?  Already I am thinking of a 70/20 degree insert to ensure the chisel is held at a repeatable angle in the SE-77 blade clamp or am I over thinking this?  I’m certainly going to have to look at the SE-77 next time I’m passing my w/w store which will be weeks away unfortunately but thanks for bringing it to my attention. 

RichColvin:
Richard,

I looked up the Pfeil 1s, and it seems similar to my small skew carving chisel (I am a Two Cherries fan).  As shown below, it is about 11mm wide across the end.


The next picture shows this chisel mounted askew in the SE-77 jig.


The next picture doesn't show it well, but I've sharpened both sides equally.  In this picture, I've positioned the USB about as close as I can get it to the stone, and was able to measure a bevel angle around 18°, which would result in an included angle around 35-36°.

One option would be to have two skews, and sharpen each skew on only one side (one for left sides; the other for right).  Then the bevel angle would equal the included angle (like on a bench chisel).


The projection I used for this is shown below.  (I showed it in mm and inches.)


What would be interesting to see is how the included angle might be reduced by using the MB-100 multi-base and grinding on the side of the stone.  I don't have one of those, but someone (like maybe, Ken) could try this!

Hope that helps.

Good luck, and kind regards,
Rich

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version