Author Topic: Bench Chisel Basics - Video on FineWoodworking  (Read 571 times)

Offline RichColvin

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Bench Chisel Basics - Video on FineWoodworking
« on: April 08, 2019, 11:09:47 pm »
Great video from Fine Woodworking's executive art director Michael Pekovich about using bench chisels.  Not about sharpening, but covers use of chisels and the effect such use has on sharpness.


Kind regards,
Rich
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Rich Colvin
www.SharpeningHandbook.info - a reference guide for sharpening
www.OTBoK.info - help those getting started in ornamental turning -- to make that journey easier.

You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.

Offline Ken S

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Re: Bench Chisel Basics - Video on FineWoodworking
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2019, 01:18:19 am »
Well done video, Rich. Thanks for posting it.

This method of cutting dovetails is more involved than the method I learned from Ernie Conover. Ernie is a traditional woodworker. His dovetail cutting technique, while precise, seems more in tune with woodworkers of an earlier age before router jigs did most of the dovetails. The FWW method reminded me of Wootz' knife sharpening technique, very precise, but more geared to precision than speed. I see value in knowing both methods.

Ken

Offline Boski51

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Re: Bench Chisel Basics - Video on FineWoodworking
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2019, 04:14:54 pm »
Rich-thanks for posting that.  I really enjoyed his take on this.  As I am learning traditional woodworking techniques, I find I am enjoying woodworking more.  I am producing projects much slower, but this is my hobby and not my vocation so I am good with that.

Offline RichColvin

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Re: Bench Chisel Basics - Video on FineWoodworking
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2019, 05:48:39 pm »
Andy,

I’m the same way. It’s about the journey & the enjoyment of that.

And I love that the Tormek gets me back on the path faster.

Kind regards,
Rich
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Rich Colvin
www.SharpeningHandbook.info - a reference guide for sharpening
www.OTBoK.info - help those getting started in ornamental turning -- to make that journey easier.

You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.

Offline Ken S

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Re: Bench Chisel Basics - Video on FineWoodworking
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2019, 07:45:25 pm »
Boski,

Your post brings an interesting thought to mind.The Tormek is eversatile enough to not only handle sharpening many tools, but, also , to handle sharping tools in different ways. my thoughts on chisels also apply to knives and other tools. We have a number of professional knife sharpeners on the forum, including farmers market ¨weekend warriors¨who may have to sharpen one hundred knives iin a Saturday morning.I also recall a shop teacher years ago who had to sharpen over a hundred chisels. We also have sharpeners, typified by Wootz, who do very high end sharpening. In this case, edge quality far exceeds time involved as a priority. We also have most of us, like me, who are in the middle and just want very sharp tools.

I believe we will be best served by becoming fluent in several techniques, allowing us to handle the odd large order, the eqully odd very demanding order, and the garden variety trade. I agrree with Rich that the journey should be as enjoyable as the destination. I enjoy sharpening, and my favorite tools to sharpen are chisels. I hope your sharpening is equally enjoyable.

Ken

Offline Boski51

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Re: Bench Chisel Basics - Video on FineWoodworking
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2019, 03:15:38 am »
Ken,

I actually enjoy sharpening quite a bit.  I am still very much a novice, but I find it relaxing and thought provoking at the same time.  I find that when I don't get the result I was hoping for, I ask why.  I try to research but I find most of my most valuable learnings come from trial and error.  While not the most efficient method of learning, it seems to be my most effective teacher. As i age, I find that I get more enjoyment from the process of woodworking/sharpening/really anything more than the finished product.  Don't get me wrong, I strive for very sharp tools and beautiful work product, but I find that I am less flustered by a less that optimum result like I was when I was a bit younger.  This may sound a little "crunchy" but I enjoy the zen of shaperning and woodworking. 

Cheers

Offline Ken S

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Re: Bench Chisel Basics - Video on FineWoodworking
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2019, 11:06:26 am »
Boski,

Your post resonates. Most of us, myself included, sharpen things for pleasure. All too often, we go through life at a breakneck pace, thinking only of getting from point A to point B, not enjoying the little roadside pleasures along the way. While the Tormek can be used efficiently for volume sharpening, it is ideally suited for enjoying the sharpening journey. There is no worry about overheating our tools. There is no grinding dust or sparks. Compared to most power tools, the Tormek is almost silent. The slower speed of the grinding wheel is very safe and the grinding is very controlled. Using the Tormek reminds me of watching the image appear in the developer tray in my photographic darkroom using fiber paper. The image revealed itself over a couple minutes, an experience far more satisfying than the almost ¨pop¨of resin coated plastic paper.

I wrote the tips and techniques topic at the top of Tormek General to allow new users the opportunity of getting to know the Tormek with controlled trial and error. There is no substitute for just doing it. A mid width bench chisel is probably the most stripped down tool we sharpen. There is only one bevel. The standard 25 degrees is easy and consistent to set up. The bevel is large enough to be observed easily and not so large as to be strenuous to sharpen. unlike knives and carving tools, the large flat chisel back makes using the Anglemaster pleasant, rather than arduous. The humble bench chisel reduces the anxiety of having so many variables to learn at once. It allows the user to concentrate on enjoying the sensual parts of sharpening, getting to know the sound and feel of grinding.

It took me a long time to really learn how to use the stone grader and truing tool. I prefer to use the phrase ¨to become fluent¨with these operations. Like many of us, I had to get past the ¨precious grinding wheel¨hurdle. Sharpening is so much more pleasant with a properly trued, dressed and graded grinding wheel. I believe that many of us never reach that fluency. That is unfortunate. The ¨learning curve¨is not really that steep or long.

I have about a dozen 3-4¨Irwin (formerly Marples) Blue Chip chisels. These are my practice and learning tools. They are ideally suited for these purposes. They are a good width and length to fit the square edge jig easily. They are economical. I would guess my average cost is around $8 US for each chisel. They are neither premium tools nor junk.Having three or four is quite adequate. They allow the user to compare different stages of sharpening or different grinding wheels. How does the 4000 grit SJ wheel compare with good technique with the SG and leather honing wheel? What is the effect of spending more time with the leather honing wheel or using different honing compounds? These questions are asily answered be comparing different chisels-

I will get off of my soap box. I m pleased that you have found the joy of using the Tormek. Please continue to share your obseervations.

Ken