Author Topic: Leather wheel polishing  (Read 2458 times)

Offline Erivan

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Leather wheel polishing
« on: June 01, 2019, 07:14:12 pm »
Hello there !

Even if I am a real Newbie in the Tormek community, I've been sharpening for a couple of years (decades ... D'oh  )

I've been using a leather wheel and a leather strop for years. I love it as I really had great results.

Now, the question : the Tormek wheel is "inside out", meaning the inner side of the skin is outside. I used to work the other way round, always using the "soft" side of the skin.

Besides, I use a Cr203  compound I prepare myself, based on Cr2O3 powder and some vaseline fat.

I always got very sharp edges.

Now I wonder ...

Was I wrong ? Could I get better ?

Your comments are most welcome.

Rgds.

Offline Jan

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2019, 09:08:24 pm »
Tormek compound PA-70 uses Al2O3 with Mohs hardness 9.0, while the hardness of Cr2O3 is 8.0-8.5. Mohs hardness of diamond is 10.

Jan

Offline Antz

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2019, 12:46:08 am »
I’m not nearly as knowledgeable on this subject as a lot of other forum members are but from all the reading I’ve been doing I think I have a decent understanding. There are many different media’s you can use to do a final polish on a knife such as felt, paper wheels, leather, strop pads, wood, etc. the goal of stropping as I’ve come to understand it is to cleanly remove what’s left of the burr or burr root/wire edge. As long as that is accomplished I don’t think the media you’re using is that critical, example; leather smooth side or  “inside out”. As long as it’s fully deburred. Now I know from reading Wootz book that different media at different speeds does have an affect on lasting edge retention if you want to be that critical about it, and for that matter the angle of which you strop/deburr at also has an affect as well as the type of burr which in turn depends on the type of steel. Different burrs require different deburring processes to accomplish the finest edges. I recommend reading the book “Knife Deburring: Science Behind The Lasting Razor Edge” by Dr. Vadim Kraichuk. That book really opened my eyes to what it means to deburr/strop. His method is what I am currently trying to emulate. Best book and system I’ve ever read on the topic of knife sharpening.

Antz
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Offline wootz

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2019, 12:08:00 pm »
Erivan, I've seen Tormek leather wheels that are too rough to be usable. This does not happen often, might be just your bad luck to get such a wheel. Well, my luck as well, as of 3 Tormeks in our workshop one came with the rough leather wheel.
It is easy to fix by sanding with #400 sandpaper on a wooden block.
Having finished sanding, wipe the wheel with a rag wet with WD-40 or any light oil to remove the sanding abrasive particles off the leather.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2019, 12:16:13 pm by wootz »

Offline Erivan

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2019, 09:13:31 pm »
Dear all,

Thanks for your help. That made me think a lot, thanks to the new ways you're paving for me.

I'll try to be as clear as possible :

- Jan : thanks for your comment. Though, I'm not too concerned (but maybe I'm wrong...) with the difference in Mohs, as I'm not facing very high HRC, up to now. Would you think the result is much different with HRC in the 58 range ?

- Antz : thank you so much for the reading advice ! I absolutely didn't a clue deburring could be that complex. I'll  try ans read the book.

- Wootz : You make a very interesting point. Thanks for that ! I understand the purpose of you solution. But as I'm not sure my current evaluation is correct, I  remain in doubt... Maybe I should see if it is possible to buy a "blank" stropping wheel and glue my usual leather to it...

So, I'll go back to my workshop... And try different things. Today's challenge is a very thin and long fillet knife, made (I'm afraid) of pretty poor steel. I'll have to be really careful with that one...

Cheers !

Offline dusmif

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2019, 12:03:12 pm »
While we are on this subject, what one can use instead of the  Tormek compound for the  leather wheel that I could find local.
Thanks.
Alf

Offline Ken S

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2019, 02:23:05 am »
Alf,

Check this out....

https://youtu.be/UckPmizllk0

Wootz does quite well with Tormek PA 70 compound.

Ken

Offline dusmif

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2019, 08:33:38 am »
Alf,

Check this out....

https://youtu.be/UckPmizllk0

Wootz does quite well with Tormek PA 70 compound.

Ken

Thanks Mate.
Alf

Offline Erivan

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2019, 02:49:03 am »
Alf,
To act local (the Belgian way), I went to a fantastic shop called "droguerie Le Lion" (https://droguerie-bruxelles.be/)
They sold me some cheap CR2O3 powder and some vaseline oil and hard mineral fat, like the one they use for making candles.
I tried various mixes, depending on the use.
My guess is to stay above the 50% CR203 in every single lix, but that is just a guess?
Then , the mixes are softer and have a higher fat content to use one the strop, and on the contrary can/must be somehow "dry" or "hard" when to be used ont the wheel.
The proof of the pudding...
Take care.

Offline dusmif

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2019, 10:23:58 am »
Thank you Erivan.
Somebody told me autosol is great, I use it to clean brass, I give it a try.
Alf

Offline Erivan

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2019, 11:15:32 pm »
Antz,

Thanks so much for your very constructive comment,  I appreciate.

But... How do I know my blade is "fully deburred", as you mention.

 As I don't own a BESS machine...


Rgds


I’m not nearly as knowledgeable on this subject as a lot of other forum members are but from all the reading I’ve been doing I think I have a decent understanding. There are many different media’s you can use to do a final polish on a knife such as felt, paper wheels, leather, strop pads, wood, etc. the goal of stropping as I’ve come to understand it is to cleanly remove what’s left of the burr or burr root/wire edge. As long as that is accomplished I don’t think the media you’re using is that critical, example; leather smooth side or  “inside out”. As long as it’s fully deburred. Now I know from reading Wootz book that different media at different speeds does have an affect on lasting edge retention if you want to be that critical about it, and for that matter the angle of which you strop/deburr at also has an affect as well as the type of burr which in turn depends on the type of steel. Different burrs require different deburring processes to accomplish the finest edges. I recommend reading the book “Knife Deburring: Science Behind The Lasting Razor Edge” by Dr. Vadim Kraichuk. That book really opened my eyes to what it means to deburr/strop. His method is what I am currently trying to emulate. Best book and system I’ve ever read on the topic of knife sharpening.

Antz

Offline Erivan

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2019, 11:26:25 pm »
Dusmif,

I'm glad you liked it, but don't be afraid to ask if I can do more :)

Being a Newbie, I can only learn.

I (nearly daily) use Cr2O3 based compound.

Let me know if and how I can help.

Rgds


Thank you Erivan.
Somebody told me autosol is great, I use it to clean brass, I give it a try.
Alf

Offline dusmif

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2019, 11:33:20 pm »
Dusmif,

I'm glad you liked it, but don't be afraid to ask if I can do more :)

Being a Newbie, I can only learn.

I (nearly daily) use Cr2O3 based compound.

Let me know if and how I can help.

Rgds

Thanks.
Alf.


Thank you Erivan.
Somebody told me autosol is great, I use it to clean brass, I give it a try.
Alf

Offline Erivan

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Re: Leather wheel polishing
« Reply #13 on: June 27, 2019, 11:42:30 pm »
Dear Wootz,
I read so much of you...

You're kind of a "Lucifer" to me. And please take some time to read that "Lucifer" is no evil at all, but "The lightbringer".

Just as you are.

Rgds


quote author=wootz link=topic=3980.msg27296#msg27296 date=1559556480]
Erivan, I've seen Tormek leather wheels that are too rough to be usable. This does not happen often, might be just your bad luck to get such a wheel. Well, my luck as well, as of 3 Tormeks in our workshop one came with the rough leather wheel.
It is easy to fix by sanding with #400 sandpaper on a wooden block.
Having finished sanding, wipe the wheel with a rag wet with WD-40 or any light oil to remove the sanding abrasive particles off the leather.
[/quote]