Author Topic: glossary (from an earlier topic)  (Read 2389 times)

Offline Ken S

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glossary (from an earlier topic)
« on: August 03, 2019, 11:38:00 pm »
This is a continuation of brain cramp's suggested glossary topic, linked here:

https://www.tormek.com/forum/index.php?topic=4029.0

Ken

Offline Ken S

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2019, 05:12:42 pm »
I contacted support for help. Support responded with an outstanding post:

“The code is actually German.
In the beginning of Tormek the largest market was Germany. When Torgny Jansson designed the knife jigs he used German language to name the jigs.
SVM stands for
Schleifvorrichtung Von Messer.”

Thank you, support. The mystery is solved. “Schleifvorrichtung” is the German word for "grinding device". “Von” is the German word for "of". "Messer" is the German word for "knife", as in "Messerschmidt", "meaning a smith who made knives".

I was mistaken in thinking the origin was Swedish. Now we know "the rest of the story".

A special thank you for support. Tormek, like much of Scandinavia, is presently in the middle of the traditional several week long annual summer holiday. Support answered my email while on vacation. I call that going above and beyond. That dedication is much appreciated.

Ken

Offline Jan

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2019, 08:58:21 pm »
IMHO grammatically correct German name for knife jig should be Schleifvorrichtung für Messer. The abreviation SVM is unchanged because it is composed from the following letters Schleifvorrichtung für Messer.

Jan

Offline Ken S

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2019, 09:44:34 pm »
Jan,

Even with my limited German (two years back in college), the Von instead of für surprised me. Either way, it explains the elusive SVM.

Ken

Offline Jan

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2019, 08:45:23 am »
Ken, on page https://www.tormek.com/germany/de/ you will get current German names for all Tormek jigs and accessories.

Jan

Offline Ken S

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2019, 01:06:42 pm »
Jan,

Outstanding post. We share a love of languages. I have occasionally looked at some of the Tormek sites in different languages. This situation makes me aware that I need to do more exploring. Incidentally, your post also answered my next question. Now that I know the M is for Messer, what do the rest of the third letters stand for? It's all on the German language website.

I still find it puzzling that a Swedish company uses German designations for its jig designations. That may be because of living in a narrowly mostly unilingual country. Multilingual culture is much more interesting.

Here is a followup post from support:

"Hi Ken.
I was a bit stressed when I wrote my answer..my mistake was revealed on the forum.. It is not von, it is fur messer..
I am sorry..   I blame my iPhone..
I am back at work tomorrow and then my spelling should improve.."

My learned friend in support is quite knowledgeable in all technical things Tormek.  He just needs a newer iPhone.  :)

Ken

Offline Twisted Trees

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2019, 01:49:53 pm »
My experience of Sweden is it is mostly empty, population of the whole country is about the same as Greater London. So any company making a product in Sweden really needs to find buyers in larger quantities, Germany is an obvious export target.

As far as language goes Swedish television broadcasts a lot in English (actually mostly American) with subtitles so most of my Swedish friends speak excellent English, though they can't spell colour or centre  ;) The main cities in the south are actually quite multicultural, but further north the population is quite sparse and mostly been there for generations acclimatizing to the cold.

The beauty of initials and numbers is they become a language of their own, hopefully with the growth and accessibility of the glossary we will all soon speak fluent Tormek.

Offline Ken S

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2019, 04:28:21 pm »
Interesting post, TT.

One of my pet peeves with US television programs is the use of poor grammar, especially with shows for small children. Hollywood could do much better. If we are exporting American English, we should at least do it right.

I can envision benefits to the Tormek community from a uniform glossary, whether we decide to use colour or color.

Ken

Offline RichColvin

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2019, 05:59:03 am »
@TwistedTrees, are you from a Nordic country?

@Ken, I wholeheartedly agree!
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Rich Colvin
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www.ColvinTools.com

You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.

Offline Twisted Trees

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2019, 09:21:38 am »
No Rich, I am from the densely populated United Kingdom, which is how I know to spell colour with a u in it :-) but along with my hobby of making sawdust and shavings, I also ride motorcycles and travel often to Scandinavia as it is empty! Principally Sweden as my wife and I have made many friends there.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2019, 09:35:32 am by Twisted Trees »

Offline Hatchcanyon

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2019, 02:34:47 pm »
Quote
Messer" is the German word for "knife", as in "Messerschmidt", "meaning a smith who made knives".

Partially right, partially not.

"messer" means "knife" but "Messerschmidt" is not a man making knifes. This would be a "Messerschmied". "Schmidt" is a common German name. There was a company by this name famous for its 2 seated microcars in the 1950ies and infamous for WWII fighter planes.

But its right "Schmidt" comes probably from a misspelling of "Schmied".
German is a bit tricky - of course!

Rolf
« Last Edit: August 09, 2019, 02:36:42 pm by Hatchcanyon »
German with a second home in the American Southwestern Desert - loves Old England too.

Offline Jan

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2019, 04:22:56 pm »
Look, we have a little German language corner here.  :)

Jan
« Last Edit: August 09, 2019, 04:28:16 pm by Jan »

Offline Ken S

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #12 on: August 10, 2019, 04:16:55 pm »
Thanks for posting, Rolf. Considering that my great grandparents left the old country in the 1870s, I accept "partially right, partially not" as a compliment.  :)  Our 1920 census lists them as "German speakers".

Jan, if the original Tormek had been robotic, I am quite sure the jig designations would have been in Czech.  :)

While I do not want linguistics to dominate this forum, I do find them fascinating.

Ken

Offline MikeK

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2019, 12:13:32 pm »
"Schmidt" is a common German name. There was a company by this name famous for its 2 seated microcars in the 1950ies and infamous for WWII fighter planes.

Not to be pedantic, but the German company that made the bF-109 and the KR200 car was Messerschmitt (no "d" in the name).   ;D

Offline Ken S

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Re: glossary (from an earlier topic)
« Reply #14 on: August 11, 2019, 02:08:25 pm »
Well done, Mike. I checked; your Messerschmitt spelling is correct.

Ken