Author Topic: preventing corrosion  (Read 177 times)

Offline TORwcb

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preventing corrosion
« on: September 14, 2019, 12:59:52 am »
My Tormek 2000 was purchased from a friend, it is several years old.  I decided to use the dry grindstone for the first time and discovered that the shaft and washers were corroded. The pictures shows the disassembled parts after wire wheel cleaning. I am assuming that this is the result of leaving the grindstone on to dry out between uses. Is it normal good practice to remove the wet grindstone after each period of use? Also, when I reassemble, is white lithium grease the best choice for the shaft and bearings?

Offline Ken S

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Re: preventing corrosion
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2019, 06:04:58 am »
Welcome to the forum, William.

I believe most of the rusty shaft and washers were caused by not removing the water trough after sharpening. Tormek switched to stainless steel shafts in 2006.

You have a couple options to correct your problem: Your shaft seems to have only mild surface rust. A rust eraser or Scotch Brite pad would probably clean it up. I would recommend replacing the rusted washers. If you live in the US, the best place to get Tormek replacement parts is Advanced Machinery (advmachinery.com). Regardless of where you live, the diagrams on their website are useful to get the parts numbers. For other areas, check with support (support@tormek.se) or check with your dealer or national agent. Consider replacing the nylon bushings at the same time.

The second, more expensive option is the MSK-250 kit. This kit includes the lTest stainless steel EZYlock shaft, plus the wet side stainless steel parts and a new set of nylon bushings. It costs around $70US and is quite nice.

White lithium grease works fine.

Ken

Offline RichColvin

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Re: preventing corrosion
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2019, 06:21:09 pm »
I added the MSK-250 kit to my T-2000.  Was a good investment.
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Rich Colvin
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You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.

Offline Twisted Trees

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Re: preventing corrosion
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2019, 06:48:17 pm »
If you do go for the clean up and carry on option you could use some wax on it rather than a sticky lubricant e.g. https://www.liberon.co.uk/product/lubricating-wax/ I use this on many machine tables etc. it is waterproof and adds that slip factor you want without dust sticking to it and making it messy. for things like my cast iron bandsaw table it is the only way to go!
« Last Edit: September 14, 2019, 07:39:11 pm by Twisted Trees »

Offline Ken S

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Re: preventing corrosion
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2019, 07:14:08 pm »
Good idea, TT.

Ken

Offline john.jcb

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Re: preventing corrosion
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2019, 03:20:39 pm »
I like the idea of replacing the shaft with the corrosion resistant stainless steel one.

During my engineering days working for the US Navy corrosion was a constant battle made worse by a salt water environment. Rust is insidious and it will reform quickly if even trace amounts remain. Shafts will be pitted by rust and short of using chemical means it is not possible to completely remove it by sanding without excess material removal. Once started you may be able to slow the rusting but not stop it from recurring.

Offline Ken S

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Re: preventing corrosion
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2019, 10:14:05 pm »
Interesting post, John.

Ken