Author Topic: Tormek bgm 100  (Read 433 times)

Offline Joiner8

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Tormek bgm 100
« on: February 24, 2020, 11:10:21 am »
I have just fitted the bgm 100 to my bench grinder and seem to be having problems sharpening my skew chisel.
I dont seem to be able to set the jig using hole b I'm not getting enough height I think I may have to fit a block to raise the height of the jig also should I be sharpening on the middle if the grinding wheel or slightlying higher

Online RichColvin

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Re: Tormek bgm 100
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2020, 11:40:40 am »
David,

I followed the instructions (https://www.tormek.com/media/973826/mounting_instruction_bgm-100_en.pdf) to the letter for mine, and didn’t find any issues until I had worn the grindstone wore down significantly (e.g., the 8 inch grindstone was under 6 inches).

That said, adding a block of ½ or ¾ inch plywood should not be a problem. 

I was using it on my 8 inch bench grinder.  I just switched to a OneWay Wolverine platform, and welded a piece together to enable using the XB-100 base.  That is working better for me, but I need a new 8 inch grindstone for the B setting to work. 

The worn grindstone is just too small.  And Ken taught me to accept that grindstones are like brake shoes:  consumables that have to be used and replaced on a regular basis. 

Kind regards,
Rich
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Rich Colvin
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www.ColvinTools.com

You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.

Offline Ken S

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Re: Tormek bgm 100
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2020, 12:51:39 pm »
David and Rich,

Ken continues to evolve, although sometimes the progress pace seems glacial and the path winding.

Rich, realizing that grinding wheels are long term consumables was a watershed moment for me. When I stopped thinking my Tormek grinding wheel was precious, I began to lightly true it more often, which has improved my sharpening.

For many years I have avoided the BGM-100. I thought, and still think it has interesting possibilities when used to position the support bar different. However, I do not like the heat, dust, and sparks of dry grinding. Plus, I admit to not wanting to spend the money for an eight inch dry grinder.

My thinking has changed this month. We had a post suggesting using the SVD-186 to sharpen roughing gouges. I like the idea of having the jig secured with the support bar. I have a damaged spare unhandled 3/4” roughing gouge. I thought I would try it with the SVD-186. I have experimented with non Tormek coarser grinding wheels for years. I put my 80 grit CBN wheel on my T8 and started reshaping. I am very patient, especially with one time reshaping, however, after a timed half hour, I am almost completing the first side. That's too slow, even for me. I started to rethink the BGM-100.

By chance, I was also at Hartville Hardware this past weekend for the woodworking show. I attended the excellent class given by my old teacher and friend, Ernie Conover. Ernie mentioned the BGM-100. I mentioned that I sharpen with a Tormek, but occasionally want a faster way to reshape. I asked Ernie if I should buy an eight inch dry grinder or use my old six inch grinder. Ernie answered that my six inch grinder should work fine, just smooth things out with the Tormek. Another project....... :(

For the record, I will state that if I did not already have my six inch grinder or planned to do a lot of heavy grinding, I would definitely go with an eight inch grinder instead of the six inch.

Back to your question, David. I would try Rich's suggestion of using plywood shims to find an ideal height. Clamp them or use double sided tape temporarily to find your height.

Tormek also makes an adaptor plate to work with the Oneway Wolverine rod. (OWC-1) This reorients the sleeves to vertical. The Oneway rod moves in and out, allowing horizontal adjustment. The sleeves allow vertical adjustment.

Fitting the shims won't take long. It's a permanent fix, which can also easily be modified.

Please keep us posted.

Ken

I will post when I modify my six inch grinder. Don't hold your breath; there are already too many projects in the pipeline.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2020, 01:06:47 pm by Ken S »