Author Topic: Supergrind 2000?  (Read 145 times)

Offline Paul.J

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Supergrind 2000?
« on: August 01, 2020, 05:00:08 pm »
Hi folks new member here and new to Tormek sharpening
I am a woodturner mainly and I was lucky to have picked this up last weekend as it was local and a fair price i thought.
I was told it was bought new in 2007 and has had very little use though the stone is down to just under 9" now.
I was also told that it hadn't been used in the last seven years just gathering dust under the owners bench but the motor spins the wheel and all looks good.
It came with a few jigs which i think have now been replaced by more up to date ones, such as the truing jig, the dressing stone, some paste and the two leather honing wheels and a yellow cover.
I have been looking around on here and have bought the Ezylock shaft and the adjustable support bar, but i changed the bracket that holds that around as it was clamping onto the threaded side.
Reason for buying the Ezylock is i am not sure whether to change to a diamond stone or just use the stone i have which i have trued up using the jig i had which worked well but can see the benefits of the newer version but will make do with what i have for now.
Anyway the machine cleaned up nice and does look new especially with the new support bar fitted and clean stone.
Also since i've been looking around at the older Tormeks what is the difference with the Suprergrind 2000 compared to the 2000, are they good machines have i bought wisely or not ?
I've tried to attach a picture but don't think it is loading?
« Last Edit: August 01, 2020, 06:08:50 pm by Paul.J »

Offline RichColvin

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Re: Supergrind 1200?
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2020, 05:20:58 pm »
Paul,

The 2000 uses the 250mm grindstones whilst the 1200 uses the 200 mm grindstones.

I have the SuperGrind 2000 that I bought in 2002.  I use it to sharpen woodworking tools, and also often use it to sharpen kitchen knives and my wife’s scissors.

I replaced the shaft with the EZ one, replaced the drive wheel after 15 years of use, added the USB with micro adjust, and replaced the truing tool.  Other than I’ve upgraded the jigs as many are worth that.  One especially great upgrade is the SVD-186.  Much better than the SVD-185.

Kind regards,
[/size]Rich
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Rich Colvin
www.SharpeningHandbook.info - a reference guide for sharpening
www.OTBoK.info - help those getting started in ornamental turning -- to make that journey easier.

You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.

Offline cbwx34

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Re: Supergrind 1200?
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2020, 05:37:41 pm »
That is a Supergrind 2000 right?  (I'm confused by the title).

Also, the extension shaft appears to be on the wrong side of the leather wheel, it's usually on the outside, then the profile wheels are attached to the extension.  (Although in some respects, this other way could be good in some situations).



« Last Edit: August 01, 2020, 05:44:39 pm by cbwx34 »

Offline Paul.J

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Re: Supergrind 2000?
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2020, 06:19:36 pm »
Thank you both for your replies, title now changed ::) i've been looking at that many threads think i'm cracking up ;)
Thanks for the info i will be changing the leather wheels round but that was how i got it so just left it like that.
Also forgot to mention that i think the stone is stuck solid to the shaft another reason for getting the Ezylock in case i do go the diamond route the stone can stay on that original shaft.
Does it make much difference to the sharpness of the tool, i know there will be no more truing up of the stone etc but it is a big layout and which one would be suitable for turning tools the fine or extra fine?

Offline Ken S

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Re: Supergrind 2000?
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2020, 06:58:28 pm »
Welcome to the forum, Paul.

My second edition of the handbook is presently AWOL (English idiom for "absent without leave", or in this case, in some unknown location in my house.) Going by memory, "Super Grind" refers to the grinding wheel being the manmade aluminum oxide wheel instead of the original natural grinding wheel. The Super Grind wheels are not as fine as the natural wheels, but they do cut more aggressively, hence the name Super Grind.

I happened to start with a  (new) T7. It has served me well. If I knew then what I know now, a used SuperGrind 2000
would have served me just as well. Like Rich, I would have upgraded to an EZYlock, Microadjust support bar, and TT-50. For a turner, the SVD-186 is well worth the cost.

Enjoy your Super Grind. It will probably last as long as either of us.

Keep us posted.

Ken

Offline Paul.J

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Re: Supergrind 2000?
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2020, 10:10:43 am »
Thanks for the welcome and info Ken :)

What is the difference between the SVD185 and 186?

Offline Ken S

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Re: Supergrind 2000?
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2020, 02:16:24 pm »
Here is the review I wrote for the SVD-186.

https://www.tormek.com/forum/index.php?topic=2873.0

Incidentally, there is now a newer version, the SVD-186R  (Revised). It has a locking mechanism for the rotation, useful for V tools. I wouldn't consider the R version a game changer, like the SVD-186 was, however, if you are planning to purchase a new jig, I would opt for the newer R version. The price is the same.

Ken

Offline RichColvin

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Re: Supergrind 2000?
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2020, 03:41:56 pm »
Paul,


I am sure you know that, with woodturning tools, it is important to sharpen often.  When stopping to sharpen, having a jig that can be used to easily make the same grind makes that faster, and hence is used. 


The SVD-185 was good, but the setting on the jig (JS) was via aligning an arrow on one side with marks on the other.  That was always imperfect, but it worked.


With the SVD-186, the settings are click-stops.  Really easy to reset it from the ones used for your roughing gouge (JS 6) to a spindle gouge (JS 2).


I’ve documented the settings with the jigs I typically use on https://www.SharpeningHandbook.info


Kind regards,
Rich
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Rich Colvin
www.SharpeningHandbook.info - a reference guide for sharpening
www.OTBoK.info - help those getting started in ornamental turning -- to make that journey easier.

You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.