Author Topic: Q4 which jig for plough plane blades  (Read 98 times)

Offline Ukfraser

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 17
  • On a sharper journey!
    • View Profile
Q4 which jig for plough plane blades
« on: August 02, 2020, 03:05:16 pm »
On the se 77 it mentions protrusion but not a minimum blade length.

I have a set of record plough plane blades which are about 90mm long and have an angle of 35 degrees. Can i use them in the se 77?

There is one curved one with an outside bevel and several with inside bevels which i think are outside the scope of the tormek but would be interested in anyones experience on these.

Many thanks.

Offline jvh

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 65
  • I'm a sharp craftsman!
    • View Profile
Re: Q4 which jig for plough plane blades
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2020, 09:04:47 pm »
Hello,

you can use it in SE-77 probably. Minimal protrusion length (from the jig) is about 20 mm for 35° grinding angle, see below.


jvh

Online Ken S

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6505
    • View Profile
Re: Q4 which jig for plough plane blades
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2020, 09:42:15 pm »
JVH's excellent reply illustrates a little known improvement in the SE-77 which works in your favor. The long anticipated and most publicized advance is the camber control. The other well known feature is the ability to shorten the distance between the two locking screws. While these are both significant, so is the inward taper of the jig from the tool holding plane to the support bar holes. This extra clearance translates to being able to hold shorter tools, a significant improvement.

I strongly recommend that you study the new online sharpening classes on Tormek's you tube channel. One reason I say this is because although I have used the SE-77 since it was first introduced, I did not notice the taper until watching the chisel/plane online class.

Scribe a line across the grinding wheel with a fine sharpie. (You can use a small precision square or the support bar in close to do this.) This will help keep your grinding square. Slide the movable locking screw close to your blade. Use your black marker to duplicate the bevel angle.

If you measure the Projection of the first blade you sharpen and match your other blades to that Projection, they will have the same bevel angle.

Start with your grinding wheel graded medium or fine. You can always go coarser if needed.

Keep us posted.

Ken

Offline Ukfraser

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 17
  • On a sharper journey!
    • View Profile
Re: Q4 which jig for plough plane blades
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2020, 12:08:06 am »
Thanks for all the replies for all 4 questions, all very useful.

Offline RichColvin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 681
  • Ornamental Turner
    • View Profile
    • SharpeningHandbook.info
Re: Q4 which jig for plough plane blades
« Reply #4 on: Yesterday at 03:55:15 am »
Fraser,


Look around on the UK version of eBay for an SVH-60 Straight Edge Jig.  This is the original that was replaced by the SE-77.  However, it is closer to the Universal Support Bar, so I find it useful for sharpening shorter chisels.  Doesn’t have all the bells and whistles, but useful none the less.


It is one of the few older jigs I recommend seeking.


Kind regards,
Rich
---------------------------
Rich Colvin
www.SharpeningHandbook.info - a reference guide for sharpening
www.OTBoK.info - help those getting started in ornamental turning -- to make that journey easier.

You are born weak & frail, and you die weak & frail.  What you do between those is up to you.

Online Ken S

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6505
    • View Profile
Re: Q4 which jig for plough plane blades
« Reply #5 on: Yesterday at 01:50:48 pm »
Try putting one of your plough blades in your SE-77. The extra clearance provided by the cut back on the jig sides should give you enough clearance.


Ken