Author Topic: food for thought  (Read 733 times)

Offline Ken S

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food for thought
« on: December 09, 2020, 03:08:16 am »
Advice from an experienced handtool worker:

https://youtu.be/UbAo4RpM7oM

Ken

Offline Ukfraser

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Re: food for thought
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2020, 01:03:39 pm »
Im old school and despite seeing someone far more experienced than me, im still not tempted to put my planes down on the bench that way! (But im guessing thats not what you are referring to!)

 ;)
« Last Edit: December 09, 2020, 02:25:30 pm by Ukfraser »

Offline Ken S

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Re: food for thought
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2020, 03:44:45 pm »
Excellent point, Ukfraser! Although not much debated much these days, the issue of placing bench planes on their soles or sides has been one of the great debates in hand woodworking.....

Ken

Offline WimSpi

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Re: food for thought
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2021, 11:02:52 am »
Im old school and despite seeing someone far more experienced than me, im still not tempted to put my planes down on the bench that way! (But im guessing thats not what you are referring to!)

With me, the same is true.

51 years ago I was learning to be a carpenter and one of the first things you learned was: put the plane away on the side.  And after each planing stroke, lift the back and then pull the plane back.

But I also agree with content of the video.
We sharpened on a large spinning sandstone and then the chisel was honed on a Belgian whetstone (about 6000 grid). It was done that way here in the Netherlands for hundreds of years.

Planing by hand, has three phases:
1) the quick removal of a lot of wood
2) planing the wood straight, square and to size
3) after the piece is finished: smoothing it with the smoothingplane

For phase 1, you don't need a finely sharpened chisel. The wood is also dirty and any chisel is also soon blunted. The chisel is often slightly round.

For phase 2, you do need a well-sharpened chisel (e.g., 1000-2000 grid). More important in this phase is that the chisel is and stays straight and sharp! Sharpness is important, because you will encounter counter-rotating wood at knots, for example.  Only a sharp chisel, can handle this well. Not all wood is as nice and straight as Peter Sellers shows in his video!

For phase 3, the chisel must be purely straight and very sharp. The wood surface only needs to be smooth now. Only then is 3000 to 6000 grid important.

But phase 3 is now done with sandpaper. In the old days there was no sandpaper and that's why in the old days people actually needed a 6000 grid more than they do now. 15,000 is really excessive. I completely agree with Peter Sellers on that one.
Much more important than the fine grain of the whetstone is, regular honing.