Author Topic: Stunpy Nubs on plane/chisel bevel angles  (Read 407 times)

Offline Ken S

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Stunpy Nubs on plane/chisel bevel angles
« on: July 27, 2021, 02:13:53 pm »
I think Stumpy Nubs has a lot of practical woodworking wisdom. Here are his thoughts on plane and chisel bevel angles:

https://youtu.be/IqPw3qXS3YU

Ken

Offline RickKrung

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Re: Stunpy Nubs on plane/chisel bevel angles
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2021, 05:43:55 pm »
Thanks, Ken.  Nicely informative.  I'm not an experienced hand plane user.  I fit very well into the "occasional" category as I mostly use power tools and rarely use chisels or planes.  I was not aware of the "bevel up" or "bevel down" configurations.  I believe all of mine are bevel down, but now I'll have to check.  The general bevel angle guidelines will be very useful.

Rick
Quality is like buying oats.  If you want nice clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

Offline Ken S

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Re: Stunpy Nubs on plane/chisel bevel angles
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2021, 04:22:25 pm »
Rick,

I know you make bamboo fishing poles with your planes, a more specialized use.

Ken

Offline RickKrung

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Re: Stunpy Nubs on plane/chisel bevel angles
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2021, 05:16:36 pm »
Perhaps, for those who use the traditional planing forms and hand plane, Stanley 9-1/2 or similar.  I have five such planes, 3 9-1/2s, a Lie Nielsen and one no-name (piece of junk).  We call the poles "rods" ;)

However, I use a planing machine, referred to as a "hand mill", that uses two carbide cutting inserts, set at specific angles, in a "plane" that rides along a vertically adjusted taper bar to create tapers in individual strips, that are joined (glued) into the rod blank.  This machine largely eliminates (replaces) the need for the traditional steel planing forms.  Different cross sectional geometries of the rods can be created, hex (traditional), quad, penta, octa. 

I am in the process of making a set of wooden (maple) planing forms for the occasional need for hand planing and have only recently spent the time to really learn how to sharpen the plane blades. 

The other hand planes that I have are a Stanley No. 3 & 5 and another, I think brand name Buck.  I did use the No. 3 with a freshly sharpened blade to clean up some of misalignment of the planing forms, prior to thickness planing on my DeWalt.
Quality is like buying oats.  If you want nice clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.