Author Topic: A Different Technique  (Read 136 times)

Offline Herman Trivilino

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A Different Technique
« on: October 13, 2021, 05:45:14 pm »
This video shows what appears to be a quick and easy way to sharpen scissors using only a vise and a file.

https://fb.watch/8CJiuH8Qi7/

I cannot imagine that this technique would work with anything other than a slightly dull pair of scissors that had no nicks. And you'd need a really fine file.
Origin: Big Bang

Offline Ken S

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Re: A Different Technique
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2021, 06:19:40 pm »
Herman,

Good post. I like Paul Sellers. He has practical, experienced based wisdom. The Neanderthal part of me still loves hand tools. Every shop should have a set of three mill files (bastard cut, second cut, and smooth) in at least one length.

I agree that this technique may be limited to dull scissors. I doubt that most of us are skilled "scissor doctors" with any equipment. For anyone sharpening scissors very infrequently, this method would be more cost effective than purchasing a scissors jig.

Do you which app he uses with this technique?   :)

Ken

Offline cbwx34

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Re: A Different Technique
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2021, 08:01:16 pm »
...

Do you which app he uses with this technique?   :)

Ken

That would be the "Rock Scissor Paper" app...

Knife Sharpening Angle Calculators:
Calcapp Calculator-works on any platform
or, a couple of iOS Calculators

Offline Ken S

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Re: A Different Technique
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2021, 09:10:17 pm »
Touché, CB!    :)

Ken

Offline RickKrung

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Re: A Different Technique
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2021, 03:24:25 pm »
This video shows what appears to be a quick and easy way to sharpen scissors using only a vise and a file.

https://fb.watch/8CJiuH8Qi7/

I cannot imagine that this technique would work with anything other than a slightly dull pair of scissors that had no nicks. And you'd need a really fine file.

Very interesting.  I can see this working.  I wonder if it is a solution for the "Taking Apart Henckels Kitchen Shears" question I had recently. 

This is where I'd go for the fine files that may be required:  Grobet USA Files, Swiss Pattern Precision.  I have a few of these, from "other machinists" tool boxes.  The clog easily but are excellent for that "fine" work.  For even finer, diamond files should work beautifully. 

I think the "black marker" method could work well as the app. 

Rick
« Last Edit: October 16, 2021, 02:28:25 am by RickKrung »
Quality is like buying oats.  If you want nice clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

Offline Willym

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Re: A Different Technique
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2021, 04:48:00 pm »
The vase/file technique (draw filing) might well put some "tooth" on the cutting edges of softer steel scissors and give some immediate improvement. Whether or not the edge has durability is another matter.


Offline RickKrung

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Re: A Different Technique
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2021, 05:56:21 pm »
The vase/file technique (draw filing) might well put some "tooth" on the cutting edges of softer steel scissors and give some immediate improvement. Whether or not the edge has durability is another matter.

I think that (toothiness) would depend on how one runs the file over the edge.  Drawn longitudinally, as depicted in the video, it seems there would not be much tooth, particularly with a finer file.  Pushed perpendicular (like our Tormek grinding wheels do), toothiness would be determined, to a great extent, by the coarseness of the file/stone. 

This is where I think finer grits available in diamond files would excel in refining the edge/apex.  Seems like this is pretty much the same as some of the "guided" sharpening systems that can produce bevels of as fine/polished character as one wishes.

Rick
Quality is like buying oats.  If you want nice clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

Offline Willym

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Re: A Different Technique
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2021, 09:54:25 pm »
The vase/file technique (draw filing) might well put some "tooth" on the cutting edges of softer steel scissors and give some immediate improvement. Whether or not the edge has durability is another matter.

I think that (toothiness) would depend on how one runs the file over the edge.  Drawn longitudinally, as depicted in the video, it seems there would not be much tooth, particularly with a finer file.  Pushed perpendicular (like our Tormek grinding wheels do), toothiness would be determined, to a great extent, by the coarseness of the file/stone. 

This is where I think finer grits available in diamond files would excel in refining the edge/apex.  Seems like this is pretty much the same as some of the "guided" sharpening systems that can produce bevels of as fine/polished character as one wishes.

Rick
I hadn't thought of using diamond files - good idea!